Tag: vinyl flooring

flooring options for seniors
About Floors

Choosing the right floor for elderly

Aging is a real thing that happens to all of us. With age, our motor skills get sloppier and we become more prone to falls and slips. We also have less energy to spend on mundane tasks like cleaning. The way out is to adjust.
Choosing the right floor will help seniors avoid all these complications in their everyday life.
The ideal flooring material should be soft enough to offer needed support to bones and joints in case of accidents. At the same time, the floor should be relatively easy to maintain since some elderly also struggle with mobility problems.
Here is our overview of the best flooring options for seniors that balance ease of maintenance and safety.

Carpet

Being warm and soft, carpet is often the go to flooring material for children’s rooms. It’s a great flooring choice for elderly for the very same reason. Carpet’s cushioned surface offers much-needed support in case of accidental falls. The warmth it offers underfoot can also be beneficial to elderly, who often experience lack of body heat or have a problem retaining it.

However, carpet flooring might not be the perfect choice for all seniors.
Carpet tends to collect dust particles in the fibers and sets it free every time someone steps on its surface. This can harm the indoor air quality of the space and cause health related issues, especially for seniors dealing with respiratory illnesses.
Maintaining carpet isn’t the easiest of tasks. Because of its structure spills and stains can go deep into the cloth. This can make upkeep difficult for seniors, especially those who experience mobility problems. If not cleaned properly, over time carpet can become a home for bacteria and insects and lead to sanitation problems.

Vinyl Floors

Vinyl is made out of rubber which gives the floor certain flexibility and protective ability in case of accidental slips. Installing additional felt or cork paddings underneath can make the surface even more cushiony.
Caring for a vinyl floor is as easy as it gets. Being a resilient floor it’s almost impenetrable to stains and water. Sweeping on a regular basis goes a long way to keep the floor clean. This makes vinyl flooring a truly hassle-free solution for senior citizen’s flooring needs.
The only drawback installing a vinyl floor has is its impact on the environment.
Vinyl is made from a non-renewable resource. The manufacturing process consumes fuel while setting free toxins and other dangerous byproducts.

Cork Floors

Cork floors are famous for their soft underfoot which is the very thing seniors need.
What’s less known about cork is that in addition to making tumbles and falls less painful it also helps minimize heat loss and outside noise.

Caring for a cork floor is relatively easy as long as the sealant is in place. The cork itself is a porous material, the sealant is what protects its surface from stains and spills. To keep cork floor clean all you’ll need to do is sweep or vacuum on a regular basis.

As in with every porous flooring material the major drawback with cork floors is its ability to soak up liquids. To avoid any damage of the kind, cork floor should be resealed at least once a year.
Because of its softness cork floor can easily be harmed by furniture legs, high heels or any sharp object that could poke or scrape its surface.

how to choose best floors for your basement
House Renovation, How-to

How to choose the right floor for your basement

Choosing floors is hard. Choosing some floors is harder than choosing others.
Basement floors are famous for being the problematic of the lot. Being well below the ground moisture poses a real problem/danger for them, as do concrete slabs that make it hard for wood floors to be set up properly. In the past, all of the above had a hefty influence and used to narrow down the basement flooring choices to mostly manmade synthetic materials. However, thanks to modern inventions and technological progress today it’s possible to install pretty much every kind of floor in your basement. So how do you pick one? No worries, we’ve got you covered.

Before moving on to the actual to the actual floor selection process, it’s important to determine the purpose of your basement. A simple storage room has a very different aesthetical need than a basement cinema. Deciding early on the function of your basement will make it easier to narrow down and will save you some money.

 

Concrete

Use it, it’s already there! There is a very high chance that the subfloor in your basement is made out of concrete. Concrete, once considered ugly and cold, has been gaining popularity as a mean of decor. The plain concrete surfaces in the room make the more warm materials present in the house stand out beautifully. So instead of paying extra for a new floor, consider turning your concrete subfloor into one. A good cleaning and maybe grinding down some rough spots will do it. If you are looking for a better look, try acid staining. Unlike paint, acid-staining is permanent and just looks better. For an even more sophisticated look, you can have a concrete slab polished and sealed.

 

Vinyl

Vinyl is probably the fittest material to be installed in a basement. It’s water resistant and even though it’s synthetic, it can realistically mimic most natural flooring materials including wood and tile. Most vinyl floors are designed to go right over concrete, they come either in sheets or in tiles for easier installation. Vinyl floors can be laid out in one of the two ways, glued down or “floated”. Floating is a flooring installation method used in especially humid environments.

When using the floating method there is enough space for a moisture barrier to be installed over the concrete slab of the basement for a better protection against any moisture. However, vinyl isn’t the only “floating floor”. The same approach can be used with most engineered floors.

 

Tile

Tile has been the go to floor for kitchen and bathroom forever, so it’s water resistant abilities are no secret. It can endure floods and all kinds of abuse, does not require a subfloor and is easier to clean. You can choose from numerous designs, patterns and makes (glazed for a more budget oriented basement transformation and porcelain for a richer look).
The only setback? It will most likely add to the lack of heat that is common to a basement. So you might want to consider some heating options  if you are planning to spend a lot of time in your basement.

 

Engineered Wood

We know what you are thinking, wood and humidity don’t seem like the best of combinations.
But it’s not just wood we are talking about, it’s engineered wood. Engineered wood is a stronger and bolder take on the traditional solid hardwood floors that is just as beautiful as the original. Thanks to its cross-ply structure an engineered hardwood board is 80% less likely to get affected by moisture, meaning that the chance of warping is an all time low among wooden floors.

Typically, hardwood isn’t seen as a suitable flooring option not only because of its bad water resistance but also because of installation related difficulties. However, this is only true for solid hardwood floors that require a wooden subfloor to be stapled down onto. The backing layer of engineered hardwood board can be glued straight to your concrete subfloor without much difficulty.

 

Laminate

Laminate is probably the material most people wouldn’t even consider when they are thinking about remodelling their basement. And they would be right. Regular laminate flooring wouldn’t have a long life 8 feet under the ground. But we aren’t talking regular laminate, we are talking waterproof laminate. The trick is to fully eradicate any moisture related dangers before the laminate flooring is installed. This is achieved by the same ‘floating’ method we have discussed earlier and involves a waterproof barrier between the concrete subfloor and the laminate floor. For really humid basements we would still advise using melamine infused laminate flooring.

Melamine is a moisture-resistant chemical that is mixed into the high-density fiberboard, making the laminate extra waterproof. If you want to go for a warmer feeling floor that is better at keeping out moisture than a carpet and less pricey than engineered hardwood, this and vinyl are your two best options.

 

Whatever floor you decide for for your basement, please keep in mind that right maintenance is half of the deal. Keep your basement as dry as possible and regularly inspect the premises of your house to avoid any accidental leakages.