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Blog, Hardwood Flooring, Tips & Tricks

How To Match Wood Floor Colors To Walls (+ 7 Great Color Ideas)

Have you ever walked into someone’s home and instantly felt a sense of warmth, coziness, or drama? The way a room is designed and decorated can have a huge impact on how we perceive it. One of the most important elements in any room design is the color scheme. 

 

In this blog, we will discuss how (and why) to match wood floor colors to walls and provide you with 7 great color ideas that can transform your home into a place that inspires and nurtures your soul.

How To Match Your Wood Floor Colors To Walls: Color Theory

Let’s discuss the basics of color theory. Color theory is a set of principles used to understand how different colors relate to each other. It involves understanding the color wheel and the relationships between colors. 

 

The color wheel is a visual representation of the primary, secondary, and tertiary colors. Primary colors are red, yellow, and blue. Secondary colors are created by mixing primary colors. For example, orange, green, and purple are the secondary colors. Tertiary colors are created by combining a primary color with a secondary color.

 

When it comes to matching wood floor colors to walls, you should consider the mood and atmosphere that you want to create in the room. Warm colors like red, orange, and yellow can create a cozy and inviting atmosphere. Cooler colors like blue and green can create a more calming and soothing atmosphere. Neutral colors like beige, cream, and gray can provide a subtle and sophisticated backdrop for other elements in the room.

 

Complementary vs Contrasting Color Choices

There are two main approaches to matching wood floor colors to walls: complementary and contrasting. Complementary color schemes involve pairing colors that are opposite each other on the color wheel. 

 

For example, green is opposite red on the color wheel, so they are complementary colors. Contrasting color schemes involve pairing colors that are adjacent to each other on the color wheel. For example, blue and green are adjacent to each other on the color wheel, so they are contrasting colors.

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Now that we have a basic understanding of color theory, it’s also important to know and understand the undertones of your hardwood floors in order to properly select a coordinating wall color.

 

How To Determine Hardwood Floor Undertones

To determine the undertones of your hardwood floors, you can use the following steps:

  • Clean your hardwood floors: Before you can determine the undertones of your hardwood floors, you need to clean them thoroughly. Use a hardwood floor cleaner and a mop to remove any dirt, grime, or debris that may be on the surface of your floors.
  • Examine your hardwood floors in natural light: Once your floors are clean, examine them in natural light. Stand in the room and observe the color of your hardwood floors in natural light. This will help you see the true color of your floors without any artificial lighting.
  • Look for warm or cool tones: Look for warm or cool tones in your hardwood floors. Warm tones will have a yellow, red, or orange tint, while cool tones will have a blue or gray tint.
  • Consider the species of wood: The species of wood used for your hardwood floors can also affect the undertones. For example, red oak has warm undertones, while white oak has cool undertones.
  • Use a color chart: You can also use a color chart to determine the undertones of your hardwood floors. Hold the color chart next to your floors and compare the colors to see which ones match.

 

By using these steps, you can determine the undertones of your hardwood floors and select paint colors that complement them.

Let’s dive into some great color options!

7 Great Color Ideas For Your Wood Floors And Walls

  1. Neutral on neutral

If you’re looking for a sophisticated and timeless look, consider pairing neutral wood floors with neutral walls. For example, you could pair light wood floors with cream or beige walls. This creates a subtle and understated backdrop for other design elements in the room, like furniture, artwork, and accessories.

  1. Cream and gray

If you want to add some subtle color to your neutral palette, consider pairing cream wood floors with gray walls. This creates a monochromatic look that is soothing and calming. You can add pops of color with furniture, pillows, and accessories.

  1. Bold and beautiful

If you want to make a statement, consider pairing dark wood floors with bold and bright walls. For example, you could pair dark wood floors with red or navy walls. This creates a dramatic and unforgettable look that is perfect for a statement room like a home office or dining room.

  1. Blue and beige

If you want to create a soothing and calming atmosphere, consider pairing light wood floors with blue walls. For example, you could pair light wood floors with a soft blue-gray or a robin’s egg blue. This creates a beachy and relaxed vibe that is perfect for a bedroom or living room.

  1. White and wood

If you want a clean and modern look, consider pairing white walls with light wood floors. This creates a fresh and airy atmosphere that is perfect for a small space or apartment. You can add pops of color with artwork, furniture, and accessories.

  1. Green and brown

If you want to create a natural and earthy vibe, consider pairing green walls with brown wood floors. This creates a forest-inspired palette that is perfect for a home office or reading nook. You can add plants, natural materials, and other organic elements to complete the look.

  1. Gray and gold

If you want to create a luxurious and sophisticated vibe, consider pairing gray walls with gold wood floors. This creates a chic and glamorous look that is perfect for a formal living room or dining room. You can add metallic accents, like gold or silver, to enhance the effect.

Conclusion

In conclusion, matching wood floor colors to walls is an important aspect of designing any room. Whether you want a cozy and inviting atmosphere or a sophisticated and luxurious vibe, there is a color scheme that can help you achieve your design goals. Consider the mood and atmosphere that you want to create in each room, and use color theory principles to guide your choices. 

 

If you’re not sure which colors to choose or how to pair them together, don’t be afraid to experiment and try out different combinations. You can use online tools, like Pinterest or Canva, to create mood boards and visualize the different color schemes in a room before you begin. You can also consult with a flooring expert for professional advice and guidance.

 

With the right color scheme and proper maintenance, you can transform your home into a place that inspires and nurtures your soul for years to come!

Plain Sawn vs. Quarter Sawn vs. Rift Sawn Flooring
Blog, Hardwood Flooring

Plain Sawn vs. Quarter Sawn vs. Rift Sawn Flooring

Hardwood flooring is still a trendy option for homes today. When selecting the style you want, you may notice that the planks can look different.

 

When logs get cut, it usually occurs in one of three ways: plain sawn, rift sawn, or quarter sawn. Each of these lumber types is characterized by the orientation of the log and how it gets cut at the sawmill. The placement of the log dictates the growth ring orientation on the ends of each plank. 

 

It can seem confusing, but keep reading to learn more about the differences between these cuts, how it affects the finished look, and why GC Flooring Pros offers the best installation services and variety. 

 

Before we go into all of the details, here’s your quick answer:

 

Plain Sawn Wood Flooring

 

  • Also known as flat sawn, it’s the most common cut of wood flooring.
  • The log is cut straight through, resulting in planks with a varied grain pattern, including some curved or wavy lines.
  • The planks have a more natural look and are less expensive compared to other cuts.
  • The wood may be more prone to shrinkage, expansion, and cupping due to its grain pattern.

 

Quarter Sawn Wood Flooring

 

  • The log is first cut into quarters, then each quarter is sawn perpendicular to the growth rings.
  • The planks have a straight, uniform grain pattern with no wavy or curved lines.
  • This cut makes the wood more stable, less prone to shrinkage and expansion, and less likely to warp or cup.
  • The wood has a more consistent appearance and is often more expensive due to the additional time and effort required to produce it.

 

Rift Sawn Wood Flooring

 

  • The log is first quartered, and then each quarter is cut at an angle between 30 and 60 degrees to the growth rings.
  • The planks have a straight grain pattern with a tighter, more consistent look compared to plain sawn wood.
  • This cut makes the wood more stable, less prone to shrinkage and expansion, and less likely to warp or cup.
  • Rift sawn wood is more expensive due to the additional time and effort required to produce it.
  • This type of wood flooring is less common than plain sawn flooring.

 

Now that we’ve recapped, let’s dive deeper.

What Is Plain Sawn Wood / What Is Flat Sawn Wood?

The most popular cut of lumber used on hardwood flooring is plain sawn lumber. Wider planks get produced by making parallel cuts through the log. To achieve the familiar “cathedral” grain, the annular growth rings are generally 30 degrees or less to the face of the board.

 

This particular cut is resourceful because it takes advantage of the entire log while reducing waste and optimizing yield. It is a much more effective milling method than rift or quarter sawing. Thanks to the efficacy of the product and its production, it is among the most affordable cuts of wood to boot.

 

The way that a board behaves is determined by how much it will move as the humidity fluctuates. Wood, even when dry, will continue to swell and shrink in width; however, the total amount that it moves is contingent on the grain direction.

 

For example, the tangential plain sawn grain is more unstable regarding dimensions than other cuts. Although these boards are strong, they can eventually have problems such as twisting, cupping, and warping.

What Is Quarter Sawn Wood?

Quarter sawn lumber is labeled as such logs are cut into four quarters. More specifically, the mill cuts a board from one flat plain, turns the log, and cuts the proceeding board—during the cutting; they continuously alternate it. Consequently, you end up with even narrower boards until there’s merely a wedge piece left behind.

 

Typically the growth rings are 60-90 degrees about the face of the board, giving a linear grain pattern absent the cathedral look. With White Oak or Red Oak, this cut displays a ray or flecking in the grain.

 

Because this kind of cut produces more waste and requires more labor, it’s more expensive than plain sawn lumber. Thanks to the position of the growth ring in the cut, when compared to plain sawn lumber, quarter sawn lumber is more dimensionally stable. Also, it resists contraction and expansion on the plank’s width.

What Is Rift Sawn Lumber?

The most elite cut is rift sawn lumber. You begin cutting the log into quarters just as you do with quarter sawn lumber. However, the most significant difference is that the mill cuts each quarter into a spiral pattern.

 

Next, to help understand the cuts of wood, you have to visualize the end of a log as circular rings like a clock’s face. Boards cut using the rifting method come out of sections at the 2, 4, 8, and 10 o’clock positions. 

 

As you look at the end of the board, the pattern of the grain runs between 30 to 60 degrees from its face—when cut at the optimal cut of 45 degrees. The finished look is a linear, straight grain with a consistent and clean look.

 

Keep in mind that this method creates the most waste, which increases the cost of the material. However, rift sawn lumber is the most stable cut of lumber. Although it produces the most waste, the cut is most resistant to cupping or warping.

Key Takeaways

Here are the main ways that the wood cuts differ from one another:

Plain Sawn Vs. Quarter Sawn

Despite how aesthetically pleasing the surface of plain sawn wood is, there are a few drawbacks that home and business owners will want to be aware of as they’re making their decision for flooring

 

As plain sawn wood ages and dries, the diverging grain can cause the boards to twist, cup, and maybe bow. 

 

Quarter sawn planks, on the other hand, will remain relatively stable even when humidity levels fluctuate. Plain sawn pieces will be subject to contracting and expanding, so you might notice gaps in the winter or cupping during the summer. Nonetheless, plain sawn is very beautiful and doesn’t cost as much. 

Quarter Sawn Vs. Rift Sawn

Rift sawn is very similar to quarter sawn, and these boards will be the most stable, but it’s close between these two types.

 

Still, rift sawn is the most wasteful, as large wedges of waste remain from every board. That factor makes this lumber expensive to produce, though the finished product is also elegant and less susceptible to warping. 

Plain Sawn Vs. Rift Sawn 

Generally, rift sawn planks get cut as complementary pieces to quarter sawn boards previously cut, and most people don’t choose this style. 

 

Plain sawn boards are also usually wider than rift and quarter sawn boards. Compared to plain sawn, which is very affordable and popular, rift sawn is the least common option. However, each can be stained for a different look, though many people choose to leave the natural style intact. 

Let Us Help You Choose!

GC Flooring Pros is a family-owned company that has taken pride in offering exceptional customer service and professional installation services to Frisco area residents for years. Our primary goal is to ensure that our clients feel they’ve had an excellent experience and wonderful value for their hard-earned money. 

 

Extensive knowledge about flooring materials and installation techniques, as well as premier craftsmanship, make us a top contender to help deliver the flooring you need. At GC Flooring Pros, we offer affordable solutions, transparent communication, and efficient services from start to finish. 

 

We have a vast selection of high-quality floors, from contemporary to classic and everything in between. Partnering with top brands and manufacturers worldwide helps us guarantee that you’ll have durable and beautiful floors for years to come. 

GC Flooring can help you with your commercial or residential flooring needs, contact us today for more information and get a quote. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Blog, Hardwood Flooring

How Is Engineered Wood Flooring Made? [+ Benefits & Style Features]

Engineered wood flooring is a type of flooring that combines the aesthetic appeal of natural hardwood with the enhanced stability and durability of man-made materials. It is designed to replicate the look and feel of traditional solid wood flooring while offering several practical advantages, making it a popular choice for both residential and commercial spaces.

 

But how is it constructed? In this blog, we’ll walk you through how it’s made as well as some of the benefits and style features of engineered wood flooring.

 

How Is Engineered Wood Flooring Made?

The manufacturing process involves multiple steps that combine different layers of materials to create a strong and stable flooring product. These include the selection of material, preparing the veneer, manufacturing the core and backing layers, bonding the layers, pressing, cutting and profiling, finishing, and quality control.

  1. Selection of material

The first step in the production process involves selecting the materials to be used. Typically, engineered wood flooring consists of three layers: a top layer of hardwood veneer, a core layer made of high-density fiberboard (HDF) or plywood, and a bottom layer, also known as the backing layer, which is often made of the same material as the core.

  1. Preparing the veneer

The top layer, or veneer, is made from real hardwood, which is carefully selected based on color, grain pattern, and overall appearance. The logs are cut into thin slices using a rotary lathe or a slicing machine. These slices are then dried, either through air-drying or kiln-drying, to remove excess moisture and prevent warping or cupping.

  1. Manufacturing the core and backing layers

The core layer is produced by compressing wood fibers or particles with adhesives to create a dense, stable material. For HDF, wood fibers are mixed with resin and then compressed under high heat and pressure. Plywood, on the other hand, is made by gluing together multiple layers of wood veneer, with each layer’s grain running perpendicular to the adjacent layers. This cross-grain arrangement adds stability and strength. The backing layer is made in a similar fashion but may be thinner and use a lower-grade material.

  1. Bonding the layers

The three layers are bonded together using strong adhesives, usually urea-formaldehyde or melamine resin. The top hardwood veneer is adhered to the core, and the backing layer is attached to the bottom of the core. This creates a sandwich-like structure with the core as the filling.

  1. Pressing

The bonded layers are pressed together using a hot press, which applies heat and pressure to ensure a strong bond between the layers. This process also helps to even out any slight irregularities and achieve a consistent thickness across the entire flooring plank.

  1. Cutting and profiling

Once the pressed layers have cooled and set, the large panels are cut into individual planks using a precision saw. The edges of the planks are then profiled, either with a tongue-and-groove or a click-lock system, to allow for easy installation and a secure fit.

  1. Finishing

The top veneer surface is sanded smooth and then finished with a protective coating, such as polyurethane, oil, or wax. This not only enhances the wood’s natural beauty but also protects it from wear, scratches, and moisture.

  1. Quality control and packaging

The finished engineered wood flooring planks undergo rigorous quality control checks to ensure they meet industry standards and are free from defects. They are then carefully packaged and prepared for shipping to distributors, retailers, and eventually, consumers.

 

Benefits Of Engineered Wood Flooring

Some key benefits of engineered wood flooring include:

 

  • Stability: Due to its multi-layered structure, engineered wood flooring is less susceptible to warping, cupping, or expanding and contracting in response to changes in temperature and humidity compared to solid wood flooring.
  • Versatility: Engineered wood flooring can be installed over a variety of subfloors, including concrete, plywood, or even existing flooring, making it suitable for various applications.
  • Easy installation: The planks are typically designed with tongue-and-groove or click-lock systems, which make installation easier and faster compared to traditional solid wood flooring.
  • Cost-effectiveness: While engineered wood flooring may still be more expensive than other flooring options like laminate or vinyl, it is generally more affordable than solid wood flooring, offering a similar look at a lower price point.
  • Compatibility with underfloor heating: Engineered wood flooring can be used with underfloor heating systems, unlike some types of solid wood, which may be prone to warping or damage from heat.

 

Types And Styles When Selecting Engineered Wood Flooring

Engineered wood flooring comes in a wide range of styles, allowing homeowners and designers to achieve various looks that suit their preferences and interior design themes. Some of the style variations that engineered wood flooring is available in include:

 

  • Wood species: Engineered wood flooring is available in a variety of wood species, such as oak, maple, hickory, walnut, cherry, and exotic woods like acacia and teak. Each species has its unique grain patterns, colors, and characteristics.

 

  • Plank widths: Engineered wood flooring comes in various plank widths, from narrow planks around 2-3 inches wide to wide planks over 7 inches wide. The choice of plank width can significantly impact the overall appearance of the floor and the room’s visual proportions.

 

  • Plank lengths: Engineered wood flooring planks come in different lengths, with some manufacturers offering random-length planks for a more authentic and natural look.

 

  • Surface textures: Engineered wood flooring is available with different surface textures, such as smooth, hand-scraped, wire-brushed, or distressed. These textures can add visual interest to the floor and create a specific aesthetic, from sleek and modern to rustic and antique.

 

  • Finishes: The top veneer layer of engineered wood flooring can be treated with various finishes, including matte, satin, semi-gloss, or high-gloss. The finish affects the floor’s sheen and can influence the overall look and feel of the room.

 

  • Colors and tones: Engineered wood flooring comes in a wide range of colors and tones, from natural, light, and medium shades to dark and even gray or whitewashed finishes. This variety allows you to find the perfect color to match your interior design.

 

  • Installation patterns: Engineered wood flooring can be installed in various patterns, such as straight, diagonal, herringbone, chevron, or parquet designs. These patterns can create a unique visual effect and enhance the room’s overall appearance.

 

With such a diverse range of styles, engineered wood flooring offers plenty of options to suit different tastes and design preferences, making it a popular choice for residential and commercial spaces alike.

 

By combining the aesthetic appeal of hardwood with the stability and durability of engineered materials, engineered wood flooring offers an attractive and practical flooring solution for various residential and commercial applications. Want to learn more about engineered wood flooring or get an estimate for your flooring project? See what we have available here and contact us today!

 

Engineered Wood Flooring FAQs And Recap

What is manufactured wood? Is it different from engineered wood? 

Manufactured wood is the same as engineered wood. Manufactured wood is a type of material made by combining wood fibers, particles, or veneers with adhesives and other additives to create a range of products that mimic the appearance and properties of solid wood. These products are more affordable, environmentally friendly, and stable compared to solid wood, making them a popular choice for various applications such as flooring.

 

What is the thickness of engineered hardwood?

The thickness of engineered hardwood flooring can vary depending on the product and manufacturer. Generally, engineered hardwood is available in thicknesses ranging from 3/8 inch (approximately 9.5 mm) to 3/4 inch (approximately 19 mm). The thickness of the flooring is determined by the combination of the top hardwood veneer layer, the core layer (usually made of high-density fiberboard or plywood), and the bottom backing layer.

 

What is the flooring structure of engineered wood?

As previously mentioned, the flooring structure of engineered wood consists of multiple layers that are bonded together to create a stable, durable, and visually appealing flooring product. 

 

The engineered wood flooring structure generally consists of three main layers:

 

Top layer (veneer): The top layer is a thin slice of real hardwood, which gives the engineered wood flooring its natural appearance and texture. The veneer is available in a variety of wood species, colors, and finishes, allowing for a wide range of design options. The thickness of the veneer can vary, but it typically ranges from 0.6 mm to 4 mm. Thicker veneers can be sanded and refinished more times than thinner ones, extending the lifespan of the flooring.

 

Core layer: The core layer is the middle layer and provides structural stability to the flooring. It is usually made from high-density fiberboard (HDF) or plywood. The core layer helps to prevent issues like warping, cupping, or expansion and contraction due to changes in temperature and humidity, which can affect solid wood floors. This layer also contributes to the overall thickness and durability of the engineered wood flooring.

 

Bottom layer (backing): The bottom layer, often made from the same material as the core, provides additional stability and support to the flooring. This layer helps to keep the flooring balanced and flat, further preventing warping or distortion.

 

These layers are bonded together using strong adhesives and pressed to create a stable and robust flooring product. The multi-layered structure of engineered wood flooring is what sets it apart from solid wood flooring, offering enhanced stability, resistance to moisture and temperature changes, and versatility in installation methods.

 

quartz vs marble countertops
Blog

Marble vs. Quartz Countertops: Determine the Best Choice for your Renovations 

The countertop is usually one of the showpieces of any kitchen renovation. It is something that will stand out for all of your guests to see. Not only that, but home cooks need a countertop that will stand up to the daily wear and tear of preparing their favorite meals. 

This article will dive deeply into the difference between marble and quartz for kitchen countertops to help you decide which is the best for your home. You can also take this information and use it to consider quartz vs marble countertops in the bathroom.

Marble vs Quartz Countertops For Your Kitchen

The first thing we’ll look at is the physical difference between marble and quartz. 

 

Marble is a stone used for thousands of years as a building material, with naturally occurring marble deposits found all over the world. Marble has been known for its use in building the Taj Mahal, the White House, and countless sculptures and other works worldwide. This alone helps to illustrate the strength and attractiveness of marble over time. As these legacy marble projects illustrate, you won’t need to worry about it breaking down after just a few years. 

 

Quartz, on the other hand, is a manmade material that combines naturally occurring quartzite, resin, and pigments. They are molded into slabs with resin and result in a non-porous material that is known for its durability. 

What Do Marble and Quartz Look Like?

Marble is normally a light-colored rock but can come in various colors that are created from impurities. These can create hints of blue, pink, black, and yellow. They can even be translucent. 

 

Some colors are rarer than others, which can affect the price. For example, a black marble countertop may have veins of gray or white mixed in. These veins are created by a natural process within the earth, making every countertop unique. 

 

Quartz is manmade, so it can come in just about any color you can imagine. It’s common to find quartz countertops engineered to look like natural stone, like marble or granite, but you can also order quartz with vivid colors like bright blue.

Marble vs Quartz Durability

Marble

Pros:

  • Adds natural beauty to a space with its unique and luxurious appearance
  • Resistant to heat and won’t scorch or burn

 

Cons:

  • Porous and prone to staining, scratching, and etching
  • Requires regular sealing to maintain its durability and beauty
  • Susceptible to damage from acidic substances such as lemon juice or vinegar

 

Quartz

 

Pros:

  • Non-porous and stain resistant
  • Resistant to scratches, chips, and cracks
  • Easy to clean and maintain
  • Available in a wide range of colors and patterns

 

Cons:

  • Can be prone to discoloration over time from exposure to UV light
  • Not as heat resistant as marble and can scorch or crack under high heat
  • Has a more uniform appearance, lacking the natural variation and unique patterns of marble.

How Does the Cost Compare With Marble Vs Quartz? 

You likely have a cost in mind if you want to renovate your kitchen on a budget.

 

The cost of marble and quartz countertops can vary widely depending on factors such as location, the specific type and quality of the material, and the complexity of the installation. However, generally speaking:

 

Marble:

 

  • Can be more expensive than quartz due to its luxurious and unique appearance
  • Can range from $50 to $250 per square foot, including installation

 

Quartz:

 

According to Forbes, quartz is the slightly more budget-friendly option at $55 per square foot, but it can go upwards of $100+ for unique designs. 

 

  • Can range from $55 to $150 per square foot, including installation
  • Is often more affordable than marble and can offer a more budget-friendly alternative for those seeking a durable and low-maintenance countertop option.

 

It is important to note that while quartz may have a lower upfront cost, the cost of maintaining marble over time may be higher due to the need for regular sealing and cleaning. On the other hand, the durability and low-maintenance requirements of quartz can help to offset the higher initial cost over the long term.

Marble vs. Quartz, Which is the Best? 

Both marble and quartz make amazing-looking countertops and can stand the test of time. But which is the best? The short answer is it depends on your preferences. Here are some marble vs quartz countertops pros and cons. 

 

Marble is an excellent natural stone that just screams luxury. That does place it at a higher price point, but you can be comforted knowing that your countertop is one of a kind. 

 

The natural veining of marble can also make it gorgeous in a problematic way to mass-produce in quartz. If you like to cook with high heat and place your hot roasters and pans directly onto the counter, then marble may also be an excellent option for you, thanks to the high heat resistance. 

 

Marble is a relatively soft stone, despite being crack resistant, so it still shows scratches from knives and other daily use if not sealed. 

Marble does come with a bit of extra maintenance, however. It must be sealed every six months to protect it from stains and scratches. Marble is porous, so it will stain easily if not sealed. Acidic substances like lemon juice or even ketchup can etch marble as well. 

Pros of marble:

 

  • Natural beauty: Marble has unique, veined patterns that add character and style to any kitchen.
  • Durability: Marble is a very dense material and is relatively scratch-resistant.
  • Heat resistance: Marble can withstand high temperatures without damage, making it ideal for use as a kitchen countertop.

Cons of marble:

 

  • Maintenance: Marble is porous and can stain easily, so it requires frequent sealing and cleaning.
  • Cost: Marble is more expensive than many other countertop materials, including quartz.
  • Softness: Marble is a softer material and can be easily scratched or damaged by heavy objects or sharp knives.

 

Pros of quartz:

 

  • Durability: Quartz is very hard and durable, making it resistant to scratches, chips, and cracks.
  • Low maintenance: Quartz is non-porous and does not require sealing, making it easy to clean and maintain.
  • Versatility: Quartz comes in a wide range of colors and patterns, allowing for many design options.

 

Cons of quartz:

 

  • Artificial look: Some people find that the uniformity of quartz makes it look artificial compared to natural stone like marble.
  • Heat sensitivity: Quartz is more heat-sensitive than marble, so you need to be careful when placing hot pots and pans on it.

 

Quartz is an engineered stone that not only helps keep the overall design more consistent but also helps to keep the price down a little bit. 

 

You can get quartz in many designs and colors, from natural to vivid colors. Quartz is less brittle than natural stone and holds up well against daily use, even without being sealed. As quartz is non-porous, it doesn’t need to be sealed. 

 

Quartz is an excellent option for home cooks working directly on their countertops. The only minor downside to marble is that it isn’t as heat resistant as marble, so you won’t be putting a hot pan directly on it. 

 

For those who like the luxury of natural stone, quartz also won’t scratch the same itch, but you can make it look very similar to marble if it’s just the marble look you want, and you care less about the authenticity. 

 

Read more: Pros And Cons Of Quartz Countertops

FAQ

Here are a few of the most common questions about Marble vs. Quartz Countertops

What is the cost of marble vs. quartz?

Marble generally costs between $100 and $250 per square foot. Quarts cost between $55 and $100 per square foot.

Does quartz stain easily?

No. Quartz is very stain resistant, thanks to it being non-porous.

What is cultured marble vs. quartz?

In engineered marble vs quartz, cultured marble is engineered stone that uses pulverized marble and resin. It’s usually a more cost-friendly option in comparison to quartz. Quartz is also engineered but is made with quartzite instead of marble.

Does quartz look as good as marble?

Quartz can look amazing! In some cases, it can even look just like marble. As quartz is engineered, it often is designed to look like naturally occurring stone.

Can you tell the difference between quartz and marble?

Quartz can be made to look like any type of stone, but when it is completed, it looks like marble. It can look very close to the real thing. One thing to look for is consistency in the marble design. If the plan is consistent across the countertop, it may be marble. Natural marble is also extremely glossy and slightly translucent. This gives marble countertops a sense of depth.

Which quartz looks the most like marble?

White quartz is the easiest to look like natural marble. Carrara marble vs quartz can be almost identical.

Which is more heat resistant, marble or quartz?

Marble is more heat resistant.

Conclusion

If you’re looking to renovate your kitchen, we hope this article has given you an idea of what countertop is best for you and your cooking style. If you want to read about how quartz compares to granite, check out the blog below:

 

Quartz Vs. Granite: Pros & Cons, Price, Durability & More!

 

Need some more help? GC Flooring can guide you in the right direction and help with your commercial or residential countertop purchase and installation needs. Get in touch today!

Quartz vs. Granite Pros Cons Price Durability More
Blog

Quartz vs. Granite: Pros & Cons, Price, Durability & More!

One of the most ingenious home renovations a homeowner can do is to replace cheap countertops with something more attractive and durable. Finely crafted countertops are a reliable way to alter a home’s appearance and increase its function drastically. But what is the ideal material to work with?

Many argue that you will likely compare quartz vs. granite when looking at the top contenders for countertop materials. Both materials have pros and cons and can be found in many high-end homes. Below you’ll find all of the information you need to help you choose between these excellent selections.

Granite vs. Quartz

Deciding whether you want granite vs. quartz countertops will depend on a few factors. How durable do you need your countertops to be? Are you planning to use them heavily? Style and preferred aesthetic will also be critical components in your decision. Your budget will also make a difference in what material you select.

 

It’s best to start by researching the pros and cons of each of these materials to get a better idea of what will be best for your home.

Granite Pros & Cons

Granite is an igneous rock that comes from the magma beneath the earth’s surface. It hardens into a rugged, durable rock when it reaches the cool air. 

granitejpg

There are a lot of great reasons to select granite countertops, but here is a breakdown of the pros and cons to be sure of what you are investing in:

Granite Pros

  • Not only is it relatively common, but it also doesn’t require much manufacturing from the quarry to your home. Once it’s polished, it’s ready to go. 
  • Granite is 100% natural. 
  • Granite is incredibly durable, making it a popular building material. 
  • Granite is generally more affordable to install than quartz. 

Granite Cons

  • Although it is relatively common, granite must be mined in a quarry, making it less eco-friendly than other materials.
  • Granite is porous, so although it is incredibly strong, there are certain chemicals it shouldn’t come in contact with. You will want to research acids or cleaners to avoid them. 
  • It can be harder to prevent stains on granite. It’s essential to mop up any spills quickly.
  • Granite must be sealed when it is installed and once yearly to ensure its longevity.

Quartz Pros & Cons

Quartz is a mineral that naturally occurs in other stones and rocks, including granite. The amount of naturally occurring quartz in quartz countertops depends on the manufacturer. What isn’t quartz is usually resin.

quartz

Quartz can also be quite colorful. Some of these colors are naturally occurring, but quartz can also have pigment. Gray and white are incredibly popular, but you may have even seen a pink or blue countertop at some point.

Quartz Pros

  • Quartz countertops are one of the hardest materials in the market. It is almost impossible to break quartz through force alone.
  • Quartz is non-porous, making it perfect for resisting bacteria and stains.
  • Quartz is a prevalent mineral, and about 5-10% of the countertop is resin. This makes it slightly more sustainable than granite if you purchase it locally. 
  • Quartz is slightly easier to customize when it comes to appearance.

Quartz Cons

  • Because more labor goes into creating quartz countertops, they are typically more expensive to install than granite.
  • Quartz is incredibly heavy, making installation more complex than with other materials.
  • Quartz can sustain damage from too much heat, so you must use hot pads when setting down a pan or pot.

Quartz vs. Granite Installation 

Understanding how a countertop is installed is another excellent way to help you decide between quartz and granite. 

 

Natural stone countertops are cut into slabs, which a professional fabricator then shapes. Not attempting to cut your quartz or granite countertops is important since special techniques and equipment are required. It’s also much more challenging to get an exact fit with these materials if you aren’t adequately trained.

 

Once the contractors have installed it, the granite will need to be sealed. Quartz won’t require this treatment. 

 

The whole process shouldn’t take more than a day or two, depending on how much you need to install. For small kitchens or bathrooms, it may only take a few hours.

Quartz vs. Granite Cost

So, what is more expensive, granite or quartz? Is quartz cheaper than granite? 

 

In most cases, a granite countertop is cheaper than quartz, but it will depend on a few different factors:

  • How large of a countertop you need is one of the most significant factors. Large spaces will be more expensive.
  • How long the installation takes will also significantly affect the process. This makes prepping your home for the workers a great way to help cut down on costs.
  • It’s essential to speak to different contractors to get a good estimate of how much it costs to renovate your counters. Not everyone will charge the same, but you will get an idea of the average.
  • Customizations can also significantly drive up the cost of any project. You will likely spend more if you choose to go with an unusual color or other personalization.
  • The removal of the old countertop will also drive up costs. If you feel comfortable doing your own demolition and removing it, this can bring down costs and speed up the project.

Choosing Quartz vs. Granite Countertops

Deciding which material is right for you and your home can be an overwhelming experience. With a little research, however, you can trust your gut.

 

If you still feel overwhelmed, the professionals at GC Flooring Pros can help you find the perfect countertop to fit your home. Expertise and top-quality materials can help you achieve the style and functionality of your dream home. 

 

Remember to check out the other incredible services offered so that every surface in your home shows off your impeccable taste.

Granite Colors Whats The Best Countertop Color For Your Kitchen
Blog, Interior Design

Granite Colors: What’s The Best Countertop Color For Your Kitchen?

Countertops play a big role in the overall design of your kitchen. Not only do they provide a surface to prepare food on, but they also act as a focal point for the room.

 

One of the most important decisions you’ll make when designing your kitchen is choosing the right stone countertop. If you’ve settled on granite, you then have to decide on a color. There are many different granite colors and styles to choose from, so it can be challenging to decide which one is right for you.

 

In this article, we’ll discuss the pros and cons of several popular granite countertop colors and help you decide which one is best for your kitchen.

 

Here’s what we’ll cover:

 

Why Is Granite A Good Choice For Your Countertops?

 

Granite is a popular material for countertops because it is durable, heat-resistant, and scratch resistant. It’s also easy to clean and maintain.

 

Another advantage of granite is that it comes in various colors and styles. This allows you to find a color that best compliments your kitchen’s design. 

Popular Granite Colors and What’s Best For Your Needs

 

There are many different granite colors to choose from, so it’s important to consider what will work best for your kitchen.

 

Here are some of the most popular granite colors:

Black Granite Color

Black Granite Color countertop

Black granite is a classic color that will never go out of style. It’s perfect for a modern kitchen with clean lines. Black granite is very versatile and can be used in both traditional and contemporary kitchens.

 

Since black countertops darken the space, they go best with light-colored cabinets and a surplus of natural light to keep your kitchen feeling bright.

 

One downside to black granite is that it can show fingerprints and smudges more easily than other colors. However, this can be minimized by using a granite sealer.

 

If you’re looking for a sophisticated and timeless color for your kitchen countertops, black granite is a great option.

 

White Granite Color

white granitce countertop

White granite is another classic color that works well in both traditional and contemporary kitchens. It’s perfect for creating a bright and airy feel in your kitchen.

 

White granite is a good choice if you have dark-colored cabinets or very little natural light in your kitchen. It will help to brighten up the space.

 

One downside of white granite is that it can show stains more easily than other colors. You’ll need to be extra careful when cooking or using products that might stain.

 

Overall, white granite is a beautiful and versatile color for your kitchen countertops.

 

Gray Granite Color

grey granite countertop

Gray granite is a popular color for contemporary and modern kitchens. It’s perfect for creating a sleek and elegant look.

 

Gray granite is a good choice if you have light-colored cabinets or want to create a contrast in your kitchen. It can also help to make a small kitchen appear larger.

 

Like white granite, gray granite can show stains more easily than other colors. You’ll need to be careful when cooking or using products that might stain.

 

Overall, gray granite is a beautiful color for your kitchen countertops.

 

Brown Granite Color

brown granite countertop

Brown granite is another classic color that works well in both traditional and contemporary kitchens. It’s perfect for creating a warm and inviting feel in your kitchen.

 

Brown granite is a good choice if you have light-colored cabinets or want to add some pop to your kitchen. Like with gray counters, brown can also help to make a small kitchen appear larger.

 

One downside of brown granite is that it can show scratches and smudges more easily than other colors. However, like with the black counters, this issue can be minimized by using a granite sealer.

 

Blue Granite Color

Blue granite is a rarer color that can add a unique touch to your kitchen. It’s perfect for a kitchen with a nautical or beach-inspired design.

 

Blue granite is best used as an accent color. It can be paired with white cabinets to create a beautiful coastal look.

 

Green Granite Color

Also referred to as Verde Jewel, green granite is another rarer color that can add character to your kitchen. It’s perfect for a kitchen with a nature-inspired design.

 

Green granite is also best used as an accent color. It pairs well with white cabinets and shiny cabinet hardware to create a beautiful contrast.

 

Other Granite Options That Add Character

In addition to the colors mentioned above, there are also other granite options that can add character to your kitchen.

 

Here are some of the most popular granite options:

Veined Granite

Veined granite is a type of granite that has veins running through it. This gives it a unique and luxurious look.  It’s perfect for a kitchen with a high-end design to give a “marble” feel.

Matte Finish

Matte finish granite is a type of granite that has a duller finish. This gives it a more natural look and feel. It’s perfect for a kitchen with a rustic or country design.

Choosing the Right Color for Your Kitchen Countertops

There are many factors to consider when choosing the right color for your kitchen countertops.

 

Here are some of the most important factors to keep in mind:

 

The Style of Your Kitchen

The color of your countertops should match the style of your kitchen. For example, a traditional kitchen would look best with classic colors like black or brown granite.

 

A contemporary kitchen would look best with more modern colors like white or gray granite. And an eclectic kitchen would look best with a mix of different colors.

 

The Colors in Your Kitchen

The color of your countertops should also match the other colors in your kitchen. For example, if you have white cabinets, you’ll want to choose a color that compliments them. 

 

If you have dark cabinets, you’ll want to choose a color that contrasts them. You’ll also want to consider the other colors in your kitchen, like the backsplash and flooring.

 

The Size of Your Kitchen

The size of your kitchen will also play a role in choosing the right color for your countertops. For example, if you have a small kitchen, you might want to choose a light-colored countertop to make the space appear larger.

 

If you have a large kitchen, you can choose any color you want. Remember that dark colors can make a small space appear even smaller.

 

Your Personal Preferences

In the end, the right color for your kitchen countertops is the one that you like the best. Trust your instincts and choose the color that you think will look best in your kitchen.

 

You can always ask for samples of granite colors to help you make your decision. Once you’ve chosen the perfect color, you’ll be one step closer to having the kitchen of your dreams. Have questions? We can help! Contact us today, and we can walk you through choosing the best color for your space!

 

Quartz Countertops Pros And Cons Are They Worth It
Blog, House Renovation

Quartz Countertops Pros And Cons: Are They Worth It?

 

There’s a lot of buzz around quartz countertops. They’re lauded as being stylish and durable, and many people are considering them as an option for their home renovation.

But are they really worth the investment? Here, we’ll dive into what quartz actually is and look at the pros and cons of quartz countertops to help you decide.

We’ll also answer some common questions about quartz countertops at the end. Here is what we’ll discuss:

What Are Quartz Countertops?

Quartz countertops are a type of man-made stone made from a combination of natural quartz and other materials like resin and other non-stone materials. About 10% of the countertop is made up of something other than stone to increase durability. This makes them very strong and durable, as well as more resistant to scratches and stains than completely natural stone countertop choices.

Now that we’ve covered what quartz countertops are let’s take a look at the pros and cons.

Pros Of Quartz Countertops

There are several pros and cons of quartz countertops.

Here are some pros of quartz countertops that make them a popular choice for many homeowners.

Quartz is Extremely Durable

One of the most significant advantages of quartz countertops is that they’re incredibly durable. They’re made to withstand heavy use and abuse, and they’re not as prone to chipping or cracking as other materials can be.

Quartz is also a very hard material, so it’s not as susceptible to scratches the way that softer countertop materials like soapstone or wood are.

Quartz is Low Maintenance

Another big advantage of quartz countertops is that they’re low maintenance. Because they’re non-porous, they’re very easy to keep clean. You don’t have to worry about spills or stains seeping into the material, and you can easily wipe them away with a damp cloth.

You also don’t need to seal quartz countertops as you do with granite or marble. This means one less step in your cleaning routine.

Quartz Comes in a Wide Range of Colors and Patterns

quartz countertop colors and patterns

One of the best things about quartz countertops is that they come in a wide range of colors and patterns, which makes them very versatile. You can find quartz that looks like marble, granite, or even wood.

This means you can easily find an option that fits your style and décor. You’re not limited to the traditional white or black countertop options anymore.

Cons Of Quartz Countertops

Of course, there are also some disadvantages to quartz countertops that you should be aware of before making a decision.

Quartz Countertops Can Be Expensive

One of the most significant drawbacks of quartz countertops is that they can be expensive. They typically cost more than laminate or tile countertops, and they can be comparable in price to granite or marble.

This means you’ll need to factor the cost into your budget when deciding if quartz countertops are right for you.

Quartz Countertops Can Be Difficult to Install

Another downside of quartz countertops is that they can be challenging to install. Because they’re so heavy, you may need professional help to get them properly installed in your home.

This can add to the overall cost of the project, so keep that in mind when budgeting for your new countertops.

Quartz Countertops Show Imperfections

While quartz is a very hard material, it’s not entirely immune to scratches and water spots. If you’re not careful, you may find that your countertops show wear and tear more easily than other materials.

This means you’ll need to be extra careful when using them, and you may need to clean them more often to keep them looking their best.

Now that we’ve looked at the pros and cons of quartz countertops let’s answer some common questions about them.

Quartz Countertop FAQs

Are Quartz Countertops Worth the Investment?

Quartz countertops can be a significant investment, but they offer a lot of benefits that make them worth the cost. They're incredibly durable, low maintenance, and come in a wide range of colors and patterns. If you're looking for new countertops that will last for years to come, quartz is a great option to consider.

How Much Do Quartz Countertops Cost?

The cost of quartz countertops can vary depending on the size of your project and the type of quartz you choose. Generally speaking, they tend to be more expensive than laminate or tile countertops but less expensive than granite or marble. You can expect to pay anywhere from $55 to $100 per square foot for quartz countertops.

Are Quartz Countertops Easy to Clean?

Yes, quartz countertops are very easy to clean. Because they're non-porous, spills and stains won't seep into the material. You can easily wipe them away with a damp cloth.

Do Quartz Countertops Need to Be Sealed?

No, you don't need to seal quartz countertops. They're non-porous so they won't absorb spills or stains. This makes them very easy to keep clean.

Does Quartz Chip Easily?

While quartz is a very hard material and less likely to be scratched or chipped than many other materials, it's not immune to damage. If you're not careful, you may find that your countertops show wear and tear more easily than other materials.

Do Quartz Countertops Show Water Spots?

Yes, quartz countertops can show water spots. It's best always to keep them cleaned up.

Are Quartz Countertops Durable?

Yes, quartz countertops are very durable. They're made from one of the hardest minerals on earth, so they're built to last. With proper care, they can last for years without showing signs of wear and tear.

Can I Put Hot Pans on Quartz Countertops?

Quartz countertops are pretty heat resistant; however, you should never put excessively hot items on the counter, as damage can always occur, no matter the material. Always use pot holders or trivets to protect the counter from direct contact.

Can I Cut on Quartz Countertops?

Although quartz countertops are made from a hard material, sharp items like knives can still scratch them. You would also find that your knives would dull quite quickly. Always use a cutting board when cutting on your countertops.

Are Quartz Countertops A Good Choice?

Quartz countertops are an excellent choice for many homeowners. They offer a lot of benefits that make them worth the cost. They're highly durable, low maintenance, and come in a wide range of colors and patterns. Overall, if you're looking for new countertops that will last for years to come, quartz is a great option to consider.

for years to come, quartz is a great option to consider.

Best Stone Countertops
Blog, House Renovation

Best Stone Countertops: Your Buying Guide for 2023

When it comes time to update your home’s countertops, the sheer number of choices can be daunting.  From natural stones to laminate, there is a material and style to suit every taste and budget.

Here is a guide to help you choose the best countertop for your needs, including how to get started.

Topics we’ll cover include:

  • Getting Started: The Information You Need Before Shopping
  • The Best Stone Countertops
    • Granite
    • Quartzite
    • Marble
    • Soapstone
    • Engineered Stone
  • FAQs

Getting Started: The Information You Need Before Shopping

When it comes to countertops, there are a lot of choices.

Before you start shopping, it’s important to narrow down your options by considering your needs and what will work best in your space.

Here are some things to think about:

  • Countertop material: There are many different materials to choose from, including natural stone, laminate, and engineered stone. Each has its own unique look and feel. We’ll go over the best stone countertops in more detail later.
  • Countertop style: Do you want a sleek and modern look or something more traditional?
  • Countertop usage: How will you be using your countertops? If you do a lot of cooking, you’ll want a material that can withstand high temperatures.
  • Maintenance: Some materials require more upkeep than others. Consider how easy the countertop is to clean and if you’re willing to put in the work to maintain it.
  • Budget: Countertops can range in price from $30 per square foot to $200 per square foot, depending on the material and style. Most stone countertops start at about $40 per square foot*.

*prices subject to change

Keep these factors in mind as you shop for countertops to find the best option for your home.

Countertop Measurements

You’ll also need accurate measurements to know how much countertop you need. To measure, use a tape measure and record the length and width of each section of the countertop.

If you have an L-shaped or U-shaped kitchen, you’ll need to measure each section separately. Don’t forget to measure any overhangs or areas where the countertop will extend beyond the cabinets.

It’s a good idea to measure twice to be sure you have accurate measurements. Once you have your measurements, you can use a calculator to determine the square footage of the countertop you need.

Now that you know what to consider before shopping for countertops let’s take a look at some of the best stone countertops on the market.

The Best Stone Countertops

There are many different types of stone countertops to choose from, each with its own unique look and feel. Here are some of the best options:

Granite

Granite

Granite is a popular choice for countertops because it’s durable and heat-resistant. It also has a natural beauty that can add to the value of your home.

 

Pros:

  • Granite is a durable material that can withstand high temperatures. It’s also scratch-resistant and stain-resistant.
  • Granite is a natural material that adds beauty and value to your home.

Cons:

  • Granite is a porous material, so it needs to be sealed regularly to prevent staining. It’s also a heavy material, so it requires reinforcement if used for countertops.

Pricing: Granite countertops start at $40 per square foot*.

 

Quartzite

Quartzite

Quartzite is a natural stone that looks similar to marble but is more durable. It’s heat-resistant and scratch-resistant, making it a good choice for busy kitchens.

 

Pros:

  • Quartzite is a durable material that can withstand high temperatures. It’s also scratch-resistant and stain-resistant.

Cons:

  • Quartzite is a porous material, so it needs to be sealed regularly to prevent staining. Like granite, it’s also a heavy material, so it requires reinforcement if used for countertops.

Pricing: Quartzite countertops start at $50 per square foot*.

 

Marble

Marble

Marble is a classic choice for countertops because of its beauty and elegance.

 

Pros:

  • Marble is a beautiful material that can add elegance to your home.

Cons:

  • Marble is a softer material, so it’s more susceptible to scratches and stains.
  • Marble should be sealed regularly to prevent staining.

Pricing: Marble countertops start at $40 per square foot*.

 

Soapstone

Soapstone is a natural stone that’s heat-resistant.

 

Pros: 

  • Soapstone is a durable material that can withstand high temperatures.
  • It’s also non-porous, so it doesn’t need to be sealed.

Cons:

  • Soapstone is a softer material, so it’s more susceptible to scratches.

Pricing: Soapstone countertops start at $55 per square foot*.

 

Engineered Stone / Quartz

Engineered Stone / Quartz

Engineered stone is a man-made material that’s made from a mix of quartz and other materials. This makes the color more even, as it’s not coming directly from the randomness of nature. This assures you that each counter will match another perfectly. And because it is man-made, engineered stone is more customizable in terms of colors and patterns.

 

Pros:

  • Engineered stone is a durable material that can withstand high temperatures. It’s also stain-resistant and non-porous, so you never need to seal it.

Cons:

  • Engineered stone is a harder material, so it’s more susceptible to chips and cracks.

Pricing: Engineered stone countertops start at $55 per square foot*.

 

How Do I Choose The Best Stone Countertop?

Now that you know the different types of stone countertops available, how do you choose the best one for your home? It really boils down to your preferences. Make a checklist of the factors we listed above, and prioritize them based on what’s most important to you and your family.

 

If you need help choosing, we’re always here. Contact us today, and we’ll be happy to walk you through your options.

 

Stone Countertops FAQs

How do you seal a stone countertop?

To seal a stone countertop, you'll need to purchase a sealing agent specifically designed for stone. Apply the sealer according to the manufacturer's instructions, and be sure to reseal regularly to prevent staining.

How do you clean a stone countertop?

To clean a stone countertop, you can use warm water and soap. Avoid using harsh chemicals, as they can damage the stone. For tougher stains, you can use a diluted vinegar solution.

What is the difference between granite and quartz?

Granite is a natural stone that comes in a variety of colors and patterns. Quartz is an engineered stone made from a mix of quartz and other materials. Quartz is more customizable in terms of colors and patterns, but both materials are durable and stain-resistant.

Which is better: marble or granite?

Marble and granite are both popular choices for countertops. Marble is a classic material that can add elegance to your home, but it’s more susceptible to scratches and stains. Granite is a durable material that’s heat-resistant and scratch-resistant, but it’s a porous material, so it needs to be sealed regularly.

What is the most expensive countertop material?

The most expensive stone countertop material is soapstone*.

*https://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/cabinets-and-countertops/soapstone-counter-install/

Types of Carpet
Blog, Carpet Flooring

The 6 Different Types of Carpet

Choosing the right carpet for your home is an investment, so you want to ensure that it lasts for years. While aesthetics certainly play a part, you should also consider the best options for the room you’re interested in carpeting, your lifestyle, whether you have children or pets, and the maintenance requirements. 

The first step in carpeting your home is knowing the different types of carpet available.

What are the different types of carpet?

  • Berber
  • Cable
  • Cut and loop
  • Frieze
  • Plush
  • Textured

Berber Carpet

Berber (looped) is a style of carpet made of thick, bulky yarn. Typically, it is made of olefin but is also available in wool, polyester and nylon. 

Unlike most other styles of carpet, the fibers are left as loops—hence the name—rather than sheared. The looped construction feels “bouncy” underfoot, but it’s not as soft as others. 

Durability

Berber carpet is remarkably durable because the fibers are uncut and woven very tightly, which prevents fraying.  

These factors make it very popular for high-traffic areas, like playrooms, living rooms, and children’s bedrooms. It’s also the primary carpet found in commercial office buildings.

Maintenance & Care

Berber is easy to maintain because liquid spills tend to sit on top of the pile rather than sink into it. It’s also great at hiding dirt because the loops are so dense. 

One downside is that the loops can snag, so pet claws or sharp edges can pull the fibers loose. 

Cable Carpet

Constructed of long, thick yarns, cable carpet is a luxurious style that adds coziness and warmth to your home.

The most popular fiber options are nylon, polyester, and wool, all of which offer a soft texture similar to shag.

Durability

Cable carpet performs best in low-traffic conditions, as the longer fiber length is prone to matting and crushing. That makes it ideal for bedrooms, guest rooms, and living rooms.   

This type of carpet holds moisture, affecting how it retains dirt. In that context, a cable carpet with a higher pile may appear discolored without regular deep cleaning. 

Maintenance & Care

With regular vacuuming and steam cleaning, your cable carpet should maintain its softness and color for many years. 

Cut and Loop Carpet

Featuring a combination of high, sheared tufts and lower-cut loops, cut and loop carpet is well-known for its sculptural, textural patterns. 

While the patterns can consist of different colored fibers, more subtle options in a single tone are also quite popular. 

Durability

One key drawback with cut and loop carpet is that the pattern starts to look worn down as the cut fibers fray or untwist. 

Because the pattern depends on the length difference between the cut and loop sections, it is best suited for low-traffic areas. 

Maintenance & Care

Cut and loop carpets need regular vacuuming, contributing to the worn-out appearance. 

Fortunately, the texture tends to hide dirt, so consider choosing a darker-colored carpet to cut back on how often you’ll need to vacuum. 

Frieze Carpet

Frieze or “twist” carpet has a knobby appearance because each long fiber is tightly twisted. The tightness of the twist causes the fibers to curl back on themselves, creating a soft and comfortable underfoot feel. 

Durability

One of the advantages of frieze carpet is that the twists resist matting and crushing. Because the fibers curl down, the pressure from foot traffic lands on the sides rather than the sheared top. You can use it in every carpeted room of your home with the confidence that it will stand up to wear and tear.

The texture also hides seams, making it an excellent option for rooms wider than a carpet roll or stairs. 

Maintenance & Care

Frieze carpets mask dirt, but it can be challenging to clean up liquid spills, as they tend to sink into the fibers. Be proactive by choosing stain-resistant fibers and cleaning up any accidents as soon as they happen. 

Plush Carpet

Of all the different types of carpet, plush carpet is arguably the softest. It has a smooth, flat pile made of tightly-packed fibers. 

The appearance and texture are similar to velvet, as the color looks lighter or darker depending on which direction the fibers are laying. 

Durability

Plush carpets are durable, making them a popular choice for homes with pets and children. 

The softness is luxurious and pleasant to lay on, so little ones who enjoy playing on the floor will be comfortable. 

One drawback of plush carpets is that they show indentations from footprints, vacuum tracks, and furniture because the fibers are so short and dense. While that is normal, it is something to consider before making a purchase. 

Maintenance & Care

Because of the uniform color and dense fibers, plush does best with regular vacuuming to remove dirt and pet hair. Otherwise, it can look discolored and lose some of its softness. 

Additionally, wet spills must be blotted up immediately, as they can spread quickly. You should avoid rubbing the carpet, which causes the fibers to fray and affects the texture. 

Textured Carpet

Textured carpets are highly versatile, as they can consist of either cut piles or loops that are tightly twisted and vary in length to create two different color tones. 

The appearance is more subtle than cut and loop style carpets but still adds plenty of visual interest without the tendency to appear worn down. 

Durability

Textured carpets are excellent at masking furniture indentations and stand up to even the heaviest foot traffic, so it’s perfect for busy households with pets and children. 

Because the fibers are twisted similarly to frieze-style carpets, they also resist crushing and matting.

Maintenance & Care

Like all twisted-strand flooring, textured carpets are excellent at masking dirt. The short pile also resists staining

You should maintain a regular vacuuming and steam cleaning routine to ensure the subtle patterning stays as beautiful as the day you installed it. 

Wrap Up

Carpet has long been a favorite thanks to its soft coziness, warmth, and upscale appearance. While it does require a little more care and maintenance, the different types of carpet make a huge difference in how much time you’ll need to spend on upkeep. 

The most popular types are Berber, plush, and frieze – but if you’re looking for softness, we definitely recommend the plush!

To get the most out of your new carpets, work with our professional installation team who can guide you through the best options for your home!

LVT vs LVP
Blog, Vinyl Flooring

Vinyl Flooring Showdown: LVT vs LVP Flooring

It’s time to make a decision.  You have been eyeing your options and researching the different kinds, but now you are faced with making the choice. Which one is for you?

Luxury Vinyl Tile (LVT) and Luxury Vinyl Plank (LVP) are two different kinds of luxury vinyl flooring. To help you decide which is right for you, we’ll go over the features and qualities of each, including:

  • Appearance
  • Waterproofing
  • Installation
  • Care and Cleaning
  • Durability and Maintenance
  • Lifespan

And we’ll also give you a recap of the pros and cons of luxury vinyl flooring! To start, let’s get into what each one is.

LVT vs LVP: What Is The Difference?

While they may sound similar, they actually do have some differences.

Luxury Vinyl Tile

LVT is made up of tiles that are cut to size and fit together like a puzzle. The tile is then adhered to the floor using an adhesive. LVT can be made to look like stone, ceramic, or wood.

Luxury Vinyl Plank

Luxury vinyl plank (LVP) is made up of long, thin strips of vinyl that mimic the look of hardwood floors. The planks are cut to size and fit together using a tongue-and-groove system.

Now that we know what each one is, let’s take a closer look at their features!

LVT vs LVP

LVT vs LVP: The Appearances

As we mentioned before, LVT and LVP can both be made to look like stone, ceramic, or wood.

Luxury Vinyl Tile

LVT is available in a wide variety of colors and patterns. You can find LVT that looks like marble, granite, limestone, slate, and more. It is also available in a variety of wood looks, including oak, walnut, cherry, and more. The most popular colors include shades of brown, gray, and white.

Luxury Vinyl Plank

LVP is also available in a wide variety of colors and patterns. You can find LVP that looks like hardwood floors, bamboo floors, and more. The most popular colors also include shades of brown, gray, and white.

So, what’s the difference in appearance?

When it comes to appearances, LVT and LVP are very similar. Both can be made to look like a variety of different flooring materials. They both can achieve the same general look you’re going for. The only difference is in the shape, and therefore the installation process (which we will get into later).

LVT vs LVP: Waterproofing

One of the main reasons people choose luxury vinyl tile or plank is because it is very water-resistant.

Both LVT and LVP are 100% waterproof, as they are constructed of sturdy layers of plastic. They’re especially ideal for kitchens and bathrooms that have a tendency to be exposed to moisture. 

The level of waterproofing to your flooring is an important factor to consider if you live in an area that is prone to excess moisture or flooding, or if you have young children or pets who may have accidents.

LVT vs LVP

LVT vs LVP: Installation

Luxury vinyl tile and plank are both very easy to install. Both can be “floated” over existing hard flooring, making the process easier than having to remove the flooring and start from scratch (though in some cases with different levels of flooring, adjustments may be needed).  However, we do suggest consulting with a professional about floating over old floors, this could void product warranties if the old floors are not secured properly, and prepping them might cost more than demoing the old floors.  

Luxury Vinyl Tile

LVT is a flooring option that can be installed by a homeowner, however, floor prep is essential and this might be a little difficult for the average person. The tiles are cut to size and fit together like a puzzle, then adhered to the floor using an adhesive making it an easy installation that can be handled by any vinyl flooring contractor.

Luxury Vinyl Plank

LVP is also a DIY-friendly flooring option that can be installed by homeowners. The planks are cut to size and fit together using a tongue-and-groove system.

While both can be done by a DIYer, for the utmost perfection when it comes to vinyl flooring installation, a professional is always the best route. 

LVT vs LVP: Care and Cleaning

Luxury vinyl tile and plank are both very easy to care for and clean.

To clean LVT or LVP, simply sweep the floor with a soft broom or vacuum it with a soft attachment. For tougher dirt and stains, you can mop the floor with a mild soap and water solution.

Be sure to avoid using harsh chemicals or cleaners, as they can damage the vinyl.  Steam cleaners are also not to be used.  

LVT vs LVP: Durability and Maintenance

Luxury vinyl tile and plank are both very durable and require little maintenance.

Luxury Vinyl Tile

LVT is a very durable flooring option that can withstand a lot of foot traffic. It is also resistant to scratches, dents, and stains.

Luxury Vinyl Plank

LVP is also a very durable flooring option that can withstand a lot of foot traffic. It is also resistant to scratches, dents, and stains.

Both LVT and LVP are low-maintenance floors that are easy to care for.

LVT vs LVP: Lifespan

Luxury vinyl tile and plank will both last for 10-20 years with proper care and maintenance.

Proper maintenance includes cleaning them regularly and avoiding the use of harsh chemicals or cleaners.

The Pros And Cons Of Luxury Vinyl Flooring

The answer to this question depends on your personal needs and preferences. The pros and cons of any luxury vinyl flooring are roughly the same. The main difference between the two is just the shape and pattern you’re going for.

Here are the pros and cons of these types of flooring in general.

Luxury Vinyl Flooring

Pros:

  • Flexibility with the look of stone, ceramic, or wood
  • Less expensive than the real materials
  • Water-resistant
  • Easy to install and care for
  • Very durable

Cons:

  • Not as realistic as the real thing
  • Can be damaged by sharp objects

Luxury vinyl flooring is a great choice for both homes and businesses!

Takeaway

Luxury vinyl tile and plank are both great flooring options that come with a variety of benefits. The main difference between the two is just the shape and pattern you’re going for. If you’re looking for a durable, low-maintenance flooring option that is easy to install and comes in a variety of different styles, luxury vinyl tile or plank may be the right choice for you.

Need more help deciding?  Schedule a free in-home consultation and one of our flooring experts will bring samples right to your door. We have a huge supply of vinyl flooring and we can help you compare the different options and find the perfect floor for your home or business! Schedule now.

Read our other flooring showdowns:
Tile Flooring Showdown: Porcelain vs Ceramic Tile Flooring
Hardwood Flooring Showdown: White Oak vs Red Oak Flooring