Hardwood Flooring

white oak vs red oak flooring - flooring fireplace and piano
About Floors, Hardwood Flooring, Red Oak, White Oak

Hardwood Flooring Showdown: White Oak vs Red Oak Flooring

There are several types of oak flooring, but the two we get asked about the most are white oak vs red oak flooring. The two types of oak flooring are very similar in appearance, but it can sometimes be confusing when trying to determine which type of oak is right for your home.

When the differences do arise, however, most people find that their decision is easily made by weighing all factors and determining which option suits them best based on specific points.

Here, we’ll go over each of these two types. We’ll include pros and cons, color, grain pattern, hardness, how well it matches, water resistance, and costs so you can make the best decision for your home or business flooring needs.

white oak vs red oak flooring white oak flooring

The Flooring Facts Of Red Oak

While both red oak and white oak are great flooring choices, there are some things that may make you want to choose one over the other. We’ll start with red oak.

Color

Red oak flooring is typically sold in two different colors: reddish-brown and grayish brown. The color of the wood is mostly uniform, but there can be small darker areas that are more commonly found in reddish-brown.

Grain Pattern

The grain pattern of red oak flooring is very distinct and usually has a larger variation in the shade of brown than white oak. The pattern is much more prevalent in grayish-brown red oak than in reddish-brown. Red oak also has a tendency to have a much more random pattern than white oak with a lot of variation throughout the planks.

Hardness

Red oak is not as hard as white oak and is known to dent slightly easier, especially when paired with high heels. It does maintain its durability and should not chip or scratch, though it can become damaged if enough force is applied.

According to the Janka scale, red oak is rated at 1,290. This scale is based on the force required to push a steel ball to half the depth of the wood’s width.

Matching Existing Wood

Red oak is a darker red/brown and has a more random grain pattern, so it can be difficult to match other woods. To get the best match possible, it’s recommended to get samples.

Water Resistance

Red oak is fairly resistant to water with the proper preparation, which makes it a great flooring choice for kitchens and powder rooms. However, it is not recommended to install red oak in a bathroom with a shower or tub, or over radiant heat as this may cause the wood to warp.

white oak vs red oak flooring - red oak flooring

The Flooring Facts Of White Oak

Now that we’ve gone over some of the red oak facts, let’s go over what makes white oak a good choice as well. Like red oak, white oak is a great flooring choice for those looking for something hard-wearing and durable.

Color

White oak flooring is usually sold in three different colors: light tan, medium brown, and grayish tan. The color of wood can vary greatly within the same planks, so it’s recommended to get samples if possible.

Grain Patterns

White oak has more subtle variations of color and the grain pattern is much more uniform. Instead of having a darker shade in certain areas, white oak has an earthy tone that can sometimes have a grayish hue.

The grain pattern is also more readily visible in the light tan, medium brown, and grayish tan shades of white oak.

Hardness

White oak is considered to be harder than red oak, so it can be less susceptible to denting than red oak. White oak rates 1,360 on the Janka scale, so just a bit higher than its red oak counterpart.

Matching Existing Wood

White oak is a lighter color and has a more uniform grain pattern, so it can be easier to match other woods. However, white oak may have more variation within the same planks than red oak does. As always, it’s best to get a sample.

Water Resistance

White oak is fairly resistant to water and can even be installed in areas with radiant heat, making it a solid choice for bathrooms and kitchens.

Recap: Pros And Cons of White Oak vs Red Oak Flooring

Hardness: Red oak flooring is known to be a bit softer than white oak flooring. Due to this, red oak is not as recommended for high traffic or other areas that are prone to damage. White oak flooring is better suited for those areas.

Coloring And Grain Patterns: While red oak has a tendency to show footprints, dust, and other abrasions more readily than its white oak counterpart because of the coloring, however, the more random grain also tends to hide any nicks or scratches a bit better.

Water Resistance: As far as water resistance goes, white oak flooring is slightly more resistant to water and has a tighter grain pattern than red oak, making these qualities desirable in areas where humidity or water could be present.

Takeaway

While some people choose hardwood flooring based solely on appearance, you should now have a better understanding of the real differences between red oak and white oak.

If you’re trying to decide which one to go with for your next hardwood flooring installation, ask yourself these questions:

  1. Which areas do you plan on installing the floors in?
  2. What is your budget?
  3. Do you need something that’s more resistant to water or humidity?
  4. What is the style of your home?

If you need help deciding, we’re happy to help. We also have a great supply of both red oak and white oak flooring for your needs. Get in touch with us today.

hardwood flooring in a bathroom
Bathroom Flooring, About Floors, Hardwood Flooring, House Renovation, Interior Design

Can You Use Hardwood Flooring in A Bathroom?

The hardwood flooring in your bathroom can make a huge impact on the appearance and feel of your space. But you may be wondering if hardwood is right for your situation.

If you’re considering hardwood floors for a bathroom, keep these things in mind:

  • hardwoods are more susceptible to water damage
  • hardwoods may require more time and money spent on waterproofing and sealing than other types of flooring
  • hardwoods may need periodic refinishing to maintain their beauty.

But they offer a great deal of visual appeal and beautiful flooring for years on end if they’re done right.

Overall, we recommend not using hardwood flooring in bathrooms that have a shower or tub and using them with caution and preparation in powder rooms. Read on to learn more.

Hardwood Flooring In A Bathroom Can Add Elegance And Class

The appeal of hardwood floors is hard to argue with. They add a touch of elegance and class to any room. And if you’re looking for that spa-like feeling in your bathroom, hardwood floors may be just what you need.

In fact, hardwood floors are so desirable in a home that they have been shown to increase property values by up to 10%. Another interesting study by the National Association of Realtors has shown that homes with hardwood floors can sell for an average of $5,000 more than homes without. So if you are looking at the installation of hardwood floors from an investment standpoint, it would be hard to go wrong.

However, before making your decision, it’s important to consider the pros and cons of this type of flooring, especially in an area notorious for moisture.

Hardwoods Are Susceptible To Water Damage

One of the main drawbacks to hardwood flooring in a bathroom is that it is more susceptible to water damage than other types of flooring. If your bathroom is not properly sealed with polyurethane, you may find yourself with buckled and warped floors before too long.

In addition, if water does get on your hardwoods, it can cause them to swell and even rot. This is why we do not recommend hardwood floors in a bathroom that contains a shower or bath.

A hardwood floor can be damaged by water from a number of sources, including:

  • splashing or spilling on the hardwood surface itself
  • flooding caused by clogging in pipes and drains
  • condensation that forms under tiles or slabs

However, the most common problem in a bathroom setting is when water is left to stand on the hardwood surface for a long period of time from tub and shower use.

This can lead to stains and warped boards, which will eventually cause other problems for your home.

While we don’t recommend using hardwood in a full bathroom, if you are choosing to do so, there are many different types of hardwoods available now that resist moisture a little better than traditional hardwoods like oak or maple wood. More on that below.

Hardwoods Require Proper Waterproofing

The costs of waterproofing hardwood flooring are also something to consider.

In general, hardwood floors are naturally water-resistant. However, if your bathroom has a hardwood floor, it’s likely that the room will become wet from time to time as a result of splashing or spills on the hardwood surface. We suggest cleaning up spills immediately when they happen and not leaving puddles on the hardwood.

Polyurethane seals the wood and helps make it waterproof. It also serves as a protective coating that hardwood floors need to maintain their beauty and durability over time.

These sealers can be applied by professional hardwood flooring companies or you could choose one of the many water-based polyurethane products available at your local home improvement store and do it yourself.

Hardwoods May Need Periodic Refinishing To Maintain Their Beauty

A hardwood floor that is properly maintained and has a high-quality finish can last for up to 20 years or more before it needs to be refinished. However, if you care for your floors correctly, they will last much longer.

Refinishing hardwood floors is a big job, but it can be worth it to keep your floor looking beautiful for years to come. The basic steps to hardwood floor refinishing are:

  • sand hardwood floors with a special sander
  • apply hardwood flooring stain, if desired
  • finish by applying hardwood floor protective coating

If done correctly, this process can take anywhere from four to eight hours per room depending on the size of your space and how many coats are needed to get an even coat.

What Are The Best Wood Options for Waterproof Hardwood Floors?

Hardwoods that are the least susceptible to water damage are often hardwoods that are naturally more water-resistant. These hardwood floors may include:

  • Maple (hard, durable).
  • Hickory (very hard and dense).
  • Red Oak Wood Flooring (moderately hard but still more resistant to water than most other types of wood flooring)

What About Engineered Hardwoods For Water Resistance?

Engineered hardwoods are great for water resistance because they are constructed from hardwood planks with a veneer of hardwood on top. The hardwood veneer provides the durability that is necessary for high-moisture areas like bathrooms, while engineered hardwoods can help you save money because they require less finishing and sealing than solid wood floors do.

 

Getting Help With Your Hardwood Floor Purchase

Hardwood flooring is a popular and beautiful choice for many homeowners, but it can also be difficult to choose the right style. There are so many different types of hardwood floors with so many different looks! You have to consider cost, durability, color, and finish when making your selection.

That’s why it can be helpful to get expert advice when choosing hardwood flooring for your home. A professional hardwood flooring company can help you select the right type of wood and the right finish for your specific needs and preferences. They can also give you a quote on how much the installation will cost.

GC Flooring Pros is here to help you make the best decision possible by providing you with professional advice, guidance, and recommendations based on your unique needs. We’re happy to answer any questions about our products or services at any time during your purchase process. Our experts are always available via phone call or email whenever you need them!

If you are in the Dallas, TX area and you would like hardwood flooring installed in your home, we can help with any hardwood style or finish that appeals to you. Request an in-house estimate today!

Four steps to expect during the Hardwood Floor Installation process

White Oak Hardwood Flooring

 

Are you considering a flooring upgrade in your home? If you don’t know where to start or feel overwhelmed by the various design, grain, and color choices, take a deep breath because you have come to the right place! At GC Flooring Pros, we will walk with you throughout the entire process, and to give you a heads up, here are four steps that we follow during the hardwood floor installation process, so you know what to expect:

STEP 1: Free In-Home Consultation

Once we set up an appointment, we offer a complimentary in-home consultation. It’s important that we hear your preferences as to the type and style of floors you’re wanting, and so that we can see your space, wall and cabinet colors etc in order that we can offer you the best options to enhance your home. We will also measure the rooms to give you the estimate and bring some different flooring samples. We offer several wood species, plank widths, stain colors, patterns, and designs and typically will bring the most popular choices to start.

STEP 2: Room Preparation

Once you’ve ordered the floors from GC Flooring Pros, and prior to the installation, we will inform you when our expert installers will be coming so that you have ample time to remove all furniture, draperies/curtains, rugs, paintings and all other items from the room. We do offer furniture removal and replacement services which can be discussed at the initial consult.

STEP 3: Installation

During the installation, your home becomes a construction site, so it will inevitably be noisy and disruptive and dusty. It is also advisable to cover up any furniture in nearby rooms, to avoid debris and dust. If we have installed pre-finished floors, you won’t need to go to step 4, and at this time either you or we would proceed to moving your furniture back into your home.

STEP 4: Staining Your Floors

If we have installed unfinished floors, we will then sand, stain, and put polyurethane down. Once the finish is dried, you or we can move your furniture back. We suggest using felt pads under the furniture pieces, to minimize scratches and dents onto your new floors. You can walk on your new finished floors, 48 hours after the last coat of polyurthane has been applied.

Now that you’re aware of the 4 step process of installing hardwood floors in your home, if you have specific questions or would like a complimentary in-home consultation, contact GC Flooring Pros today! We look forward to making your dream floor designs, come alive!

Hardwood Flooring Trends in 2019

GC Flooring Pros

 

Hardwood flooring is trending to be the most popular style of flooring that homeowners choose. There are several key benefits and characteristics of real wood floors: it’s timeless, comfortable, warm and attractive.

Real wood flooring makes a house a home. Homeowners choose hardwood flooring for their resilience, character and the increased value it brings to their home as floors provide a stunning backdrop to your space. If your home is on the market, the beautiful, stand out hardwood floors have a way of impressing prospective buyers.

Because hardwood flooring is a prominent feature of your home, we’ve listed a few trends that we’re seeing in 2019 that have longevity:

  • Cooler, Darker Colors: There’s a definite move away from warm tones (reds, yellow and red/brown undertones). Grey is the new, versatile “it” color and it shows no signs of slowing down. It’s neutral tones open up the many possibilities of working palettes around it and pairing its hardwood color with other elements of the room can really bring the whole look of your space together. The new “Greige” (grey+beige) color is in demand and creates a minimalist feel with the warmth of beige.
  • Elongated Tiles, Wider Planks: Planks that are 6-8” wide and 24’-48” long. This size lends to a comfortable, casual aesthetic. The wider planks also make older homes look more rustic and lend to the farmhouse appeal. In modern homes, the wide planks give it an elevated, contemporary feel.
  • White Oak – Oak accounts for approximately 80% of hardwood flooring in the USA. White Oak is a perfect choice for those wanting a minimalistic, modern look but still retaining character and beauty. Another benefit is that White Oak is easy to maintain and more water resistant than its counterpart, red oak.
  • Hardwood Cuts – More and more customers are seeing the value in rifted or quarter-sawn wood. Its linear pattern immediately draws you in and rifted hardwood expands more and contracts less, making it a great choice for those highly traffic areas such as the kitchen and living room.

If you’re looking to add or upgrade your Hardwood flooring in your home, contact GC Flooring Pros for a free in-home consultation. Click here to get started today, on elevating your home.