News

WINTER FLOORING TRENDS AND DESIGNS

Considering a home improvement project this winter? In 2019 flooring manufacturers will be producing even more looks that will mimic the latest texture trends and the most sought after flooring style. Here are some key flooring options to refresh your space with a new look!

WOOD YOU LIKE THIS?

Hardwood – Wood flooring is available from high quality manufacturers such as Armstrong, Bella Cera, and Anderson to name a few. Engineered hardwood is manufactured with layers of plywood-like wood. Solid wood flooring are made from traditional hardwood planks made from a single piece of wood. Tuscan Oak, White Oak, Soft Ash Wood are some key trends that are popping off of pinterest and into homes. What “wood” you like in your living space?

VINYL ANYONE?

Vinyl flooring is a highly popular option and a great choice and with advanced technology vinyl manufacturers can create realistic, waterproof floors that look like hardwood, tile or stone. Luxury vinyl plank flooring can be made to look like handscraped, exotic wood species and grains. If you want comfort and durability in the high traffic areas of your home, vinyl flooring is a stunning and economical choice!

TILE THIS

If you’re looking for tile that’s softer underfoot, engineered tile is a great option. Your feet will appreciate the more comfortable feel, not to mention it’s easier to maintain and clean.

Today’s many styles and design options can be a reflection of your personality and what feels comfortable and functional for your and your family. As the homeowner you can elevate the aesthetics of your home, with the upgrade of new floors – be it wood, vinyl or tile.

At GC Flooring Pros, we are here to help steer you in the right direction and narrow down all those beautiful flooring styles to find the perfect floor for your home, that fits any style, any budget. Tell us what you’re envisioning and let’s make your vision come alive. Call us at:214-814-1170 or click on the link here to receive a free in home consultation. Let’s create a space you’ll want to come home to!

Vinyl Flooring…What’s the Draw?

Vinyl flooring is a highly popular option and a great choice, due to advanced technology that has helped vinyl manufacturers to create realistic, stunning floors that look like hardwood, tile or stone. It’s durable, cost effective and low maintenance, which makes it advantageous for those who want the comfort, beauty and longevity in every day, high traffic areas of their home. We hope these following reasons will help you make an informed decisions for your next flooring project in your home:

ECONOMICAL

Luxury vinyl flooring is a smart choice, as it can be maintained easily, is economical and long lasting. The beautiful look of a wood grain from an exotic tree species is printed onto the vinyl, so you have the look without the high costs of hardwood flooring. It comes in an array of hues, patterns and grain sizes, to give the appearance of hardwood floors. Whether you go for traditional, exotic, or rustic wood looks, there are many design ideas for you to choose from that will fit your personal style!

COMFORTABLE

Vinyl floors have a foam layer that create a comfortable and soft feel, while still being durable and stain resistant. So if you’re standing for extended periods of time, this is the perfect choice for you. Some vinyl floor products also come with a sound barrier layer to muffle footsteps.

DURABLE

Vinyl floors are used in commercial and residential spaces as it’s tolerant of high traffic, resistant to spills and abrasions. It’s water proof and low maintenance capabilities make it a highly sought after option at restaurants and commercial offices.

STYLE

The trends, designs, grains and hues that are available in vinyl floor options on the market, are extensive. In 2019 vinyl manufacturers will be producing even more looks that will mimic the latest texture trends and the most sought after hardwood flooring style.

CONTACT US

GC Flooring Pros is proud to offer the latest trends in vinyl flooring as well as hardwood flooring. To book your free in-home consultation, please contact us at:214-814-1177 or fill out the estimate request form by clicking here.

How-to, Interior Design

Choosing The Right Floor For Your Home

While the floors in your home are important to the look, feel and functionality of your home, choosing the right floor doesn’t have to be an overwhelming process, so here are a few key questions to ask yourself before you start updating your home with brand new floors:

  • How much traffic do you expect the floor to receive?
  • Do you have children? (if you have older children, durability may not be that much of an issue)
  • Do you have pets?
  • Will the floors get easily wet or dirty?
  • How often will the floor need cleaning?
  • What’s your design style? (If you don’t know, we can help!)
  • What is your budget? (Will you need old flooring disposed of? Do you need extra baseboards?)

Considering your lifestyle, functionality needs, design and budget, will help steer you to the best options for your flooring needs. 

For more details, specs and ideas, call GC Flooring Pros today for a free estimate and let’s get started on your dream design for your floors!

About Floors

Water Damaged Floors

If you have water damaged floors, and are questioning whether to repair or replace, we are here to help you through the entire process and make it a worry free experience.

WOOD

Wood as an organic material, absorbs water and moisture due to indoor humidity levels, spills, or in some cases leaks and flooding. The water can cause swelling or cupping of the wood planks. To prevent damage to your floor and decor, it’s expedient to assess if the floors need to be repaired or replaced.

SIGNS OF WATER DAMAGE

Water damage can also seep into the subfloors and can be detected by some telltale signs such as these:

  • Buckling/Cupping
  • Musty Odors
  • Discoloration
  • Nails popping out
  • Sagging

If you suspect water damage, the first step is to have the floor’s condition assessed. Call GC Flooring Pros at 214.814.1177 for an estimate, to determine if your floors need to be repaired or replaced.

Quality Flooring in Frisco TX
About Floors

Choosing the right floor for elderly

Aging is a real thing that happens to all of us. With age, our motor skills get sloppier and we become more prone to falls and slips. We also have less energy to spend on mundane tasks like cleaning. The way out is to adjust.
Choosing the right floor will help seniors avoid all these complications in their everyday life.
The ideal flooring material should be soft enough to offer needed support to bones and joints in case of accidents. At the same time, the floor should be relatively easy to maintain since some elderly also struggle with mobility problems.
Here is our overview of the best flooring options for seniors that balance ease of maintenance and safety.

Carpet

Being warm and soft, carpet is often the go to flooring material for children’s rooms. It’s a great flooring choice for elderly for the very same reason. Carpet’s cushioned surface offers much-needed support in case of accidental falls. The warmth it offers underfoot can also be beneficial to elderly, who often experience lack of body heat or have a problem retaining it.

However, carpet flooring might not be the perfect choice for all seniors.
Carpet tends to collect dust particles in the fibers and sets it free every time someone steps on its surface. This can harm the indoor air quality of the space and cause health related issues, especially for seniors dealing with respiratory illnesses.
Maintaining carpet isn’t the easiest of tasks. Because of its structure spills and stains can go deep into the cloth. This can make upkeep difficult for seniors, especially those who experience mobility problems. If not cleaned properly, over time carpet can become a home for bacteria and insects and lead to sanitation problems.

Vinyl Floors

Vinyl is made out of rubber which gives the floor certain flexibility and protective ability in case of accidental slips. Installing additional felt or cork paddings underneath can make the surface even more cushiony.
Caring for a vinyl floor is as easy as it gets. Being a resilient floor it’s almost impenetrable to stains and water. Sweeping on a regular basis goes a long way to keep the floor clean. This makes vinyl flooring a truly hassle-free solution for senior citizen’s flooring needs.
The only drawback installing a vinyl floor has is its impact on the environment.
Vinyl is made from a non-renewable resource. The manufacturing process consumes fuel while setting free toxins and other dangerous byproducts.

Cork Floors

Cork floors are famous for their soft underfoot which is the very thing seniors need.
What’s less known about cork is that in addition to making tumbles and falls less painful it also helps minimize heat loss and outside noise.

Caring for a cork floor is relatively easy as long as the sealant is in place. The cork itself is a porous material, the sealant is what protects its surface from stains and spills. To keep cork floor clean all you’ll need to do is sweep or vacuum on a regular basis.

As in with every porous flooring material the major drawback with cork floors is its ability to soak up liquids. To avoid any damage of the kind, cork floor should be resealed at least once a year.
Because of its softness cork floor can easily be harmed by furniture legs, high heels or any sharp object that could poke or scrape its surface.

Subfloor in Frisco TX
About Floors

Choosing subfloor for hardwood, tile and laminate floors

The subfloor is the base for your flooring. Having the right subfloor is just as important as choosing the right floor finish, even if it’s going to hardly ever see the light of day.
Vinyl, laminate or tile or even expensive hardwood – doesn’t matter which one you choose, without proper support their durability will be compromised and you’ll end up wasting your money.
Who wants that? Noone! Here is how to make sure your subfloor is the right choice for your desired flooring.

What is a subfloor?

Subfloor is the very bottom layer of the floor that sits directly on the joists. Once the floor is installed it, subfloor gets hidden underneath. Because it’s hard to reach position, making changes to a subfloor is quite an expensive and difficult endeavor. Most subfloors stay the way they were built during the construction of the house.
The most common subfloor is 1/2″ or 3/4″ A/C-graded plywood. A/C means that the boards are smooth on the top side and rough on the bottom.
Oriented-strand board (OSB) also known as flakeboard is an alternative subflooring material. As a composite material, it shares great similarities with plywood. A single sheet of OSB is made by sealing large flakes of wood together with phenolic resins.

Underlayment

Subfloor is not to be confused with underlayment. Underlayment is what comes between subfloor and flooring surface to guarantee your floor’s best performance and keep the moisture and noise away. While subfloor is typically standard and consistent throughout the entire home, the type of underlayment used can vary from room to room depending on what type of flooring is being installed.

Cement underlayment

Cement board is the underlayment to use when installing tile flooring. It sits on the plywood or concrete surface and holds the tiles together.
Foam and cork underlayment
Foam and cork padding is the most common underlayment for laminate floors. Laminate is a hard floor and can often feel uncomfortable under your feet. The padding underneath helps cushion your step.
Plywood underlayment
Plywood can also be used as underlayment. It adds strength and helps set the height of the finish floor. In this case, you’ll have two layers of plywood present, one a subfloor layer and one an underlayment layer.

Subfloor for hardwood flooring

If you are installing hardwood flooring plywood is the best subfloor for you. Any plywood ranging from 1/2″ to 3/4″ and rated A/C will serve both solid or engineered hardwood well. If you decide to upgrade your subfloor choose tongue and groove plywood. It’s easier to install and will minimize squeaks caused by walking.

Subfloor for laminate flooring

Laminate can also be installed on a plywood subfloor. However laminate is a fairly thin floor so adding thin plywood as a secondary subfloor is advised, especially if you are installing laminate flooring in an older house. Subfloors in older houses are often no thicker than ½’’ plywood, unlike the ¾’’ thick layers in newer buildings. Because laminate is so thin it can easily show imperfections. To protect your flooring from grooves and dents you should install an underlayment, best foam or cork padding to provide some give and help smooth out any imperfections of the subfloor.

Subfloor for tile flooring

The main danger to tile flooring is cracking. Old and infected joists can be a cause for fractures. Installing stable plywood subfloor will help prevent any movement that can lead to damage. Underlayment too should have no give and be strong to support the tile floor properly. Cement board can be installed directly on top of the plywood layer.

About Floors

How To Choose The Right Hardwood Flooring Wood Species

If you are thinking about choosing a hardwood floor for your home chances are you are looking for a durable flooring option. The durability of any wood floor depends on its hardness.
The harder the floor is the better can it resist scratching and wear related damage.
However, whatever the name might suggest, not all hardwood is hard. Some woods are harder than others. How do you find out which one is right for you? Fear not, we’ve got you covered!

How hard is hardwood really?

The hardness of wood is determined by how much pressure it can withstand. The Janka Hardness Test measures the hardness of different wood species and classifies them by the results. During the testing, a steel ball with an 11.28-millimeter diameter is pressed into the wood to half the ball’s diameter. This creates a circular indention in the wood with an area of 100 square millimeters. The amount of force spent on the task is measured in pounds-force (lbf) or newtons (N).The more force this procedure requires the stronger is the wood species. Because the testing is done on the surface of the plank and the force is applied horizontally to the wood’s grain it’s possible to also determine side hardness.
To get reliable results the wood used in the test has been air-dried to a 12% moisture content.
The Janka Hardness test also gives insight on how well a particular wood can take on dents and daily wear.

Because of the different characteristics of various wood species, the difference between wood hardnesses is substantial.
The softest hardwood ever tested by the Janka hardness test is Cuipo and can withstand no more than 22-pound force. Australian Buloke is the strongest wood on the list. With 5060 pound-force, it’s well above some of the most famous exotic woods like Brazilian Walnut and Bolivian Cherry. It’s almost twice as strong as Red Mahogany and Southern Chestnut and three times stronger than the ever so popular flooring choice of Americans – Hickory.

Testing and collecting data is one thing but successfully applying the results to your next remodeling project is another thing. Knowing in advance what to expect from certain wood species will make it easier for you to choose the right kind of floor for your home.

What is the optimal hardness your desired wood species should have?

As long as you are installing a floor for residential use there is little chance you’d need something from the top of the Janka Hardness list. The most popular wood species used for home flooring purposes are usually of medium strength. Red Oak, White Oak or Maple are some of the most popular domestic flooring choices across the North America. Most of the domestic wood species tend to be of a lighter color unless stained or otherwise distressed.
Exotic woods come usually in more colors and differ from board to board. Their grain pattern is also more unusual and less continuous than in the case of domestic wood. This unique look has caused a massive spike in exotic wood floor sales in the last decade in the US. Most exotic wood species are also harder and consequently more durable than standard domestic wood species.

However, hardness isn’t always good. Most of us install a hardwood floor to avoid the trouble of removing and installing a new one years later. Solid hardwood floors can be sanded and refinished up to five times. But sanding and refinishing a truly hard hardwood floor isn’t all that easy. Because of the strong built most hard floors require very precise work and could splinter. This is also the reason why exotic wood species are more expensive to treat and require a specialist who has experience in the matter.

Domestic Hardwood Species

Red Oak

1290 lbf

Red Oak is somewhat the classic flooring choice. It’s so popular that every other wood is measured against its hardness and durability. The species usually has average to heavy graining with moderate color variations. The color of a Red oak floor can be anywhere between creamy pinks to light reds all the way to darker tones like shades of brown. Unlike white oak that has more earthly colored undertones (browns and greys), red oak is known for more pinkish appearance.

Maple

1450 lbf

This wood species is native to the northern regions of the US and Canada. Maple hardwood is mostly of a faint white color that might slightly vary from board to board. The continuity of tone throughout the board depends on the grade of the wood. Maple flooring can contain minimal to a lot of brownish/black mineral streaks. The higher the grade is the least marks of this kind occur. Maple graining (sometimes straight lines, other times curly patterns) is so fine that often times it goes unnoticed. “Birdseye” graining is also characteristic to maple. Birdseye is a distinctive pattern that resembles tiny eyes and is common in many wood species. Even though maple hardwood is mostly known as a very hardwood species, it contains areas that have softer structure. This can sometimes lead to uneven color distribution when staining the floor. To avoid blotchiness it’s recommended to use a liquid wood conditioner prior to applying a stain to your maple floor.

Hickory

1820 lbf

Hickory is one of the hardest species of wood that’s native to North America. Because of the great variety of color and unique graining, it’s one of the widely used woods too.
Coloring for Hickory hardwood flooring can range from creamy whites to medium browns and even to darker browns. To get the most out of the unique grain variation of Hickory it’s common to cut it in 5″ and wider planks.

Exotic Hardwood Species

Brazilian Cherry

2820 lbf

Brazilian Cherry is an exotic wood species known for its extreme color variations. Also known as Jatoba, it’s on the top of the Janka hardness rating. When installed it created a beautiful reddish/brown pattern with reddish/blonde highlights and occasionally deep red selections.
Unlike many flooring alternatives that tend to fade when exposed to the sun, Brazilian Cherry gets richer and darkens with exposure to light. The unique graining also plays a role in creating an interesting and inviting environment.

Santos Mahogany

2200 lbf

This hardwood species is the second-most popular choice among the exotic kind. Compared to Brazilian Cherry, the most popular exotic wood on the market, the tone of this wood remains mostly homogenous throughout the plank. Color variation ranges from medium brownish/orange to dark brown. Santos Mahogany hardwood has wavy grain that incorporates an open pattern. Just like Brazilian Cherry, when exposed to light Santos Mahogany will become richer.

Bamboo

Unlike other woods bamboo doesn’t have a set Janka hardness rating. The hardness of bamboo depends on the harvesting time. Cheaper bamboo has usually been harvested earlier than more expensive grass and is less hard.

tips on how to choose the prfect stain for your hardwood floor
About Floors, Floor Care, How-to, Tips & Tricks

How to choose the right stain for your hardwood floor

Hardwood floors are a beautiful addition to any home. Their timeless and natural look has the power to brighten even the dullest of places. From white oak to Brazilian walnut hardwood floors offer a decent flooring choice for every taste and wallet. However, the species of hardwood isn’t the only thing to determine the appearance of the floor, the stain is just as important.

Not all floors stain the same way

Different wood species come with different natural characteristics. This doesn’t only determine their performance in a certain environment but also dictates how they absorb stain so that using the same stain on two different kinds of hardwood can lead to absolutely non-comparable results. The reason behind this is their contrasting hardness. Some harder woods are denser while others are more porous and soft. This makes it easier for the staining liquid to get into the pores.

To avoid any color inconsistency it’s important to test your stain prior to application. This will give you the advantage of knowing exactly what the stain of your choice will look like on your species of wood. At GC Flooring Pros we test sample spots for our customers to find the perfect match. We only use high-quality wood stains. Some of the colors you may choose from are listed on the DuraSeal website.


Doing a stain sample will help you get the stain color for your specific hardwood species just right without having to play the guessing game.

Stain makes the room

A room is like an organism, it’s an amalgamation of different goods with different purposes that function as one. Ideally, nothing’s out of place and every detail is carefully thought through.
The floor being one of the largest surfaces in a room can greatly affect the dynamics of the space. Wrong stain tone can not only clash with your décor but affect the quality of the time you spend in the room. But the right stain can tie the place together and make your stay more enjoyable. So before making a decision, consider how it will compliment everything else in the room including the wallpaper, furnishings as well as general style and accent colors.

The most popular colors these days are Ebony, Antique Brown, Provincial, Dark Walnut, Medium Brown, Weathered oak and some combinations. If you’re going for a lighter color we suggest using white oak rather than red oak.
To give your hardwood floor an even richer look we use polyurethane varnish.
Keep in mind that the type of polyurethane can affect the color of the stain after application so there is even more reason to do a stain test first. As a general rule, oil based polyurethane tends to darken the wood a bit but it’s slightly better at resisting scratches, moisture and heat when compared with the water-based alternative. Then again, applying a water-based poly won’t lead to any changes in tone and will preserve the wood’s natural tone. You also have to choose a matte, satin, semi-gloss, or gloss polyurethane. Matte and satin are becoming more trendy, we are seeing that wood floor conglomerates do not want as much sheen these days.

Even though choosing the right stain colors can be difficult, there is not much to worry about. With solid or even thicker engineered hardwood floors you can easily refinish them to give the flooring desired tone.
Meanwhile here are some tips to help you find the perfect stain color for your hardwood floors:

Light stain

A lighter stain can help make a dark room appear brighter and more spacious than it really is. If you have dark furniture, installing lighter hardwood with somewhat matching stain will create a beautiful contrast and help your decor stand out. By choosing a lighter stain, you won’t have to clean nearly as often as in the case with dark stained floors since dust is less visible on a lighter surface. However, light stains aren’t as good at hiding hardwood’s natural imperfections as its darker alternatives.
The contrast they create with darker

Medium stain

If you aren’t one for dramatic changes this is the stain for you.
While medium stain won’t really affect the overall colour scheme of the room, it will most certainly compliment many other wooden details in your decor and still help tie the room together. A medium stain is also a reasonable option if you haven’t decided on the look of the space yet and would like to keep as many options for wall & furniture colors open as possible.

Dark stain

Dark stained floors are elegant and will help ground your bright room nicely. The balance between darker bottom and lighter top parts of the room will make the space more inviting and help the accent colors in your interior stand out more. A darker stain is superior for hiding hardwood’s natural flaws but it falls short when dealing with inflicted imperfections like scratches. Pet hair and dust aren’t easy to hide either. In a word, if you have a dog or a small child or expect above average wear because of any other reason it’d be a safer bet to go with lighter stain.

is it worth the money to install hardwood flooring
About Floors

Is installing hardwood flooring worth the money?

Hardwood is one of the most popular natural materials available for flooring purposes. Solid and engineered hardwood floors both can successfully transform any space into a more warm and welcoming environment. Praised for its beauty and richness it also possessed impressive durability capabilities.
Despite being more expensive than most alternative flooring options, hardwood’s ability to be refinished is a convincing argument for many who are looking to install a new floor.

But really, how far can you stretch your hardwood floor’s life? And is it worth it at all?

How much does new hardwood flooring cost?

There are dozens of different hardwood floors available on the market and the prices vary just as much. As a rule, the grade of the wood is one of the biggest factors to determine the price. Higher the grade more expensive the floor. Hardwood of the highest grade comes in a longer boards has no blemishes and is a uniform color. The cheapest hardwood is the least “tame”, it’s rich with knots and blemishes and shows the raw character through the mixed color. The boards of this grade also tend to be as short as 24”.
The species of the wood, as well as your location, also play a significant role in determining the price for your hardwood floor installation. The rare types of wood like Sakura or Kempas tend to be more expensive than Maple or Oak which are more common in the US.
Typically, flooring suppliers quote the cost for installing a hardwood floor on a square-foot basis. The price for a lower to upper-grade hardwood varies between $4-8. Prefinished floors cost on average $2 more than unfinished.
There are other costs to consider In addition to what you pay for the floor itself. The price for installation varies depending on whether the floor needs to be nailed down, glued to the subfloor, or floated. Laying hardwood in a smaller room can also get more pricey since a lot of complicated trimming needs to be done to ideally fit the boards to your room’s borders and around other tightly located obstacles. There are also expenses that have little to do with the actual flooring, including delivery, moving furniture, and preparing the subfloor.

How durable is Hardwood really?

Both engineered and solid hardwood are durable flooring options. Even though they are built differently – solid wood is made from a single wood board while engineered hardwood is a composite product – the surface layer is in both cases real wood and has similar resistance to wear.
Density plays a big role in hardwood’s durability and is directly proportional to the floor’s hardness. Unlike what the name implies, not all hardwood floors are hard. Some are soft enough to get scratched. According to the Janka hardness test, which is used to measure how well different woods can withstand pressure, most hardwood species used for flooring purposes are of average hardness. Hickory, for example, can take 1820 lbf, most types of maple around 1400 lbf, white oak 1360 lbf and red oak 1290 lbf.

How much does refinishing cost?

The cost of refinishing hardwood floors varies based on floor material, floor condition, used equipment and the length of required labour. Usually, a 100 square feet room can be refinished in about 4-5 hours. The average price to refinish hardwood floors lies between $1.50 – $5.00 per square foot. This excludes the more exotic types of hardwood. They are difficult to work with and require extra care when being sanded. Some exotic floors can easily burnish due to their hardness if not treated carefully. Others leave dust behind that can harm people’s health and should be treated by an experienced flooring professional who will take adequate measures when working on such floor. These demands for extra care makes refinishing exotic wood more expensive.

How often can you refinish your floor?

The thicker the floor the more times can it be refinished. On average, solid hardwood floors can be refinished up to 5 times. Engineered hardwood floors with a wear layer of 2mm or thicker can be sanded and refinished as well.
However, thickness isn’t the only factor to be concerned with when refinishing your floor. Who does the work is just as important. Refinishing a floor means sanding off the top layer full scratches and blemishes to reveal new wood underneath and then re-applying color treatments and seal. More precise sanding will leave you with a thicker board and prolong your hardwood floors life.

What floor to install if you have a dog
About Floors, Tips & Tricks

What floor to install if you have a dog

Flooring advice for pet owners

If you are a devoted human to your four-legged friend, you’d want to choose the one flooring that best suits their needs, Preferably, besides offering good enough support (for your pet), it should be also durable and easy to clean (for your own sake).
In this blog, we have set out to help you on this hard but noble quest. To start it off, here are some general tips to help you select the best floor for your furry friend.

Pet nails are a menace

Pet nails can scratch or snag and this can damage some types of floor. So you need to find a solution that’s most resistant to this danger. ing more than others. Trimming nails is not a solution either. Blunt, broad-tipped nails can still gouge the sealer, creating long, shallow dents. Forget floor runners, you definitely don’t have as much power over your dog (even if you believe you do). So it’s better to match your floor to your pet and not the way around.

Bladder control is hard

Once your dog has been trained it’s very rare that you’ll have to face this problem but if your pup is young there is a good chance that it won’t make it outside every time to relieve itself. In addition to unpleasant odor pet urine can leave bad stains. Some types of floors are better at dealing with that than others.

Muddy paws are fun

All that dirt from running through puddles won’t just stay out. No matter how well-behaved your dog is, parts of it will definitely end up on your new floor. You have been warned./Consider yourself warned. So choose the floor that can be cleaned effectively without any fuss.

Dogs can have allergies too

Allergies are a huge topic when choosing a new floor, but rarely in regard to our pets. Sadly, dog allergies are real and could put your four-legged friend in danger. You might not know of any existing allergies if your dog’s never been in contact with the irritant before. That’s why you should test/observe how a certain flooring material affects your pet beforehand.
Still, most floor related allergies in dogs are a reaction to the floor cleaners and the chemicals they contain. Always use cleaning products that have been approved and are safe for your dog’s consumption. Because, you know, dogs like to lick everything.

Flooring Options

Woof, woof! Now that you’ve got an idea what to look for, we can move to selecting that one perfect floor for your little pup.

Vinyl

Vinyl has proven itself as the finest example of resilient flooring on the market today. It’s full of controversies and benefits. Even though it offers soft enough padding to enjoy walking around barefoot, most quietscratches and liquid spills don’t faze it. Vinyl doesn’t trap dust or allergens and all you’ll need to clean it is a simple mop and warm water. Vinyl also happens quietest flooring option after carpet, something dog owners will definitely come to appreciate.
The floors come in sheets and tiles as well as in all colours and patterns including different hardwood species and natural stone. Vinyl flooring is definitely a great alternative for those pet owners, who want to get hardwood floor but would like something more durable.

Pros & cons for human: Easy to clean, can mimic natural materials but real hardwood still looks better.
Pros & cons for dog: It’s soft and warm. No apparent cons.

Ceramic or natural stone tiles

Ceramic and natural stone tiles are hard surface floors that can match your pet’s claws pretty well. They don’t scratch as easily as other floors and if they do the scratches are barely visible and don’t really stand out from the natural pattern. You dog’s mishaps don’t pose any problem either since both products can endure liquid spills when sealed properly and can be cleaned easily. The glazed option with extra protective layer may keep the water out more efficiently but its slippery surface can be somewhat uncomfortable for your dog to walk on. Cold too unless your place has underfloor heating. If you go with tile or stone be sure to put down rugs throughout the house so your dog has plenty of space to relax.

Pros & cons for human: Scratch and waterproof as well as easy to maintain but colder and louder than other floors.
Pros & cons for dog: Less allergenic and pleasantly cool in the summer months. However too hard to sleep on without a rug, requires underfloor heating in the winter.

Laminate

Laminate floor is designed to resist scratches. Its impenetrable clear top layer keeps the high-quality image layer underneath well protected. Like vinyl, laminate can mimic an array of natural materials including wood.  A damp mop can go a long way when trying to keep your floor clean. However, that same wear layer that’s responsible for most of laminate’s advantages can be uncomfortable for your dog. It allows little to no grip and can lead to accidents, especially with older animals.
It’s also louder than natural stone or ceramic tiles. It will amplify your dog’s footsteps like no other solid floor. So if you are an owner of an energetic breed you might want to skip this one.
Laminate isn’t as hard as tile but not as soft as vinyl ether. For better comfort for your dog, you still might consider using rugs here and there.

Pros & cons for human: Easy to clean, can endure scratches but can be loud.
Pros & cons for dog: Warmer and more comfortable than tile but offers little to no traction at all.

Wood

Wood and sharp claws don’t go well together. Resisting scratches and spills isn’t most woods’ strong suite. Trimmed nails can still damage the sealer, leaving behind long shallow dents.
But if you absolutely have to have a wood floor, you could choose from these three options.

  • Go for the super-hard wood species
    Some wood species are naturally stronger than others. According to the Janka hardness test Brazilian Walnut, Hard Maple, Oak and Hickory floors have a better chance against your furry friend.
  • Get already distressed wood
    Get a hardwood floor that has been already distressed. That way you won’t notice any new scratches. If anything they’ll add to the character of your wood floor!
  • Try SoftPaws
    SoftPaws are applicable nail caps for dogs.They cover your dog’s nails to keep them blunt and harmless and protect your floors, doors and furniture from dreaded scratches.